Wydział Elektryczny PB

Course description cards, winter 2021/2022

Basics of Photonics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameBasics of PhotonicsCourse codeIS-FEE-10001W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
00300000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesAcquainting students with the main theme of photonics research (metrology devices and systems, sensors and photonic technologies). Identification of areas of photonics applications including respectively: optical fiber technology, laser technology, optical and fiber-optic telecommunication, semiconductor optoelectronics, integrated optoelectronics. Overview of selected problems of photonics: geometrical and wave optics, propagation of the electromagnetic wave in free space and the dispersion medium. Acquainted with the elements of nonlinear optics. Teaching the principles of operation and measurement of the elements of photonic systems: cylindrical and planar optical fibers, elements of optical fiber network, optical modulators. Acquainted with the materials and microelectronic technologies. Overview of contemporary directions in the field of photonics.
Course contentThe basics of the optical phenomena theory in semiconductors and optical waveguides. Low dimensional structures – the principle of the use of quantum wells in semiconductor emitters of radiation. Engineering of the photonic bang gap – super-network. Interfaces in photonic structures. Periodic optical structures – a construction of selected elements, methods of analysis and development perspectives. The construction and selected applications of the matrix of sources and detectors with low-dimensional structures. The phenomenon of optical bistability. Bistable photonic components. Optical logic elements. Nonlinear phenomena.
Teaching methodslaboratory class
Assessment methodevaluation of reports, tests of preparation for laboratory exercise
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has detailed knowledge of photonics
LO2explains optical phenomena occurring in semiconductors
LO3discusses the construction of photonic structures
LO4characterizes the construction of photonic structures
LO5measures and analyzes the properties of semiconductor radiation emitters
LO6measures and analyzes the spectroscopic properties of materials used in photonics
LO7represents contemporary trends photonics, finding their usefulness in technic
LO8understands the role of photonics in modern knowledge-based society
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
LO2evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
LO3evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
LO4evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
LO5evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
LO6evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
LO7discussion on the report of the exercise, observation of the work in the classroom
LO8discussion on the report of the exercise, observation of the work in the classroom
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationpreparation for the laboratory30
description of laboratory reports or doing homework assignments (homework)20
participation in lab sessions / student-teacher consultations30
prepare to pass the module20
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities1004.0
Basic references
  1. Safa K.: Cambridge illustrated handbook of optoelectronics and photonics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2012.
  2. Jamal M. D., Basu P. K.: Silicon photonics : fundamentals and devices. John Wiley & Sons, New York 2012.
Supplementary references
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMarcin Kochanowicz, Jacek Żmojda, prof. Andrzej Zając20-02-2020

Basics of Lighting Technology

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameBasics of Lighting TechnologyCourse codeIS-FEE-10002W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300150000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesFamiliarizing students with basic light quantities, units and electric light sources. Using luxmeter and luminance meter. Teaching the methodology of main photometric measurements. Familiarizing with current problems in illuminating engineering.
Course contentVision and light. Basic light quantities and units (luminous flux, luminous intensity, illuminance, luminance). Spectral distribution of light quantities. Lambert law. Correlation between illuminance and distance from the source. Types and parameters of light sources. Spatial distribution of light intensity. Basic measurements in light technology. Procedures of chosen light measurements. Using chosen light meters (luxmeter, luminance meter). Standarization in lighting technology – introduction to lighting design. Light – human interaction. Energy efficiency in lighting.
Teaching methodslaboratory experiments, lecture/consultations, self-work, discussion
Assessment methodlecture: written exam; laboratory class: verification of preparation for classes, evaluation of the reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1lists and explains light quantities
LO2shortly characterizes electrical and optoelectronic light sources
LO3can use the lightmeter and luminance meter
LO4performs measurements of chosen light quantities
LO5can provide simple calculations connected with lighting
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam, evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classesL, LC
LO2exam, evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classesL, LC
LO3observation during the laboratory classes, reportsLC
LO4observation during the laboratory classes, reportsLC
LO5observation during the laboratory classes, reports, evaluation of case studiesL, LC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in the laboratory15
preparation for the laboratory15
description of laboratory reports10
participation in lecture / student – teacher consultations30
preparing to pass the exam20
case studies/homeworks40
TOTAL:130
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation452.0
Student workload – practical activities854.0
Basic references
  1. Standard CIE S 017/E:2011: International Lighting Vocabulary, 2011.
  2. IESNA Lighting Handbook, New York, 2000.
  3. Winchip S.: Fundamentals of lighting. Fairchild Books, 2011.
  4. Lighting fundamentals handbook (technical report). Electric Power Research Institute, 1992.
  5. Ryer A.: Light measurement handbook. International Light, 1998.
  6. Ganslandt R., Hoffmann H.: Handbook of lighting design. 1992.
  7. Khan T.Q.: LED Lighting – Technology and Perception, Wiley, 2015.
Supplementary references
  1. Taylor A.: Illumination fundamentals. Lighting Research Center, 2000.
  2. Csele M.: Fundamentals of light sources and lasers. Wiley Interscience, 2004.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeUrszula Błaszczak, Ph.D. Eng.30.01.2020

Control of Electrical Drives 1

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameControl of Electrical Drives 1Course codeIS-FEE-10003W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
1501530000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe construction and the features of the electrical drives in steady state and in transitional states. Operating point and the basic parameters of the selected electric drives systems. Students develop the practical experience on energy conversion in open loop and closed loop automatically controlled electric drives.
Course contentLecture: Control characteristic of motor and power converter. Torque – speed characteristics of electrical motors and generators. Multi-quadrant operation of the electric motors and the converter controlled DC and AC drives. Power flow and energy losses. Structure and synthesis of simple drive system subsystems. Quality control assessment. Laboratory classes: Investigation into speed control system with DC servomotor motor drive, investigation into steady state and transient features. Investigation into position measurement system with resolver in the sine – cosine operating mode. Investigation into position measurement system with resolver in the phase shifter operating mode. Investigation into control characteristic of variable speed control system with induction motor, DC/AC converter and frequency adjustment. Project: The student designs and simulates in Matlab the automatically controlled electric servodrive.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory experiments, demonstration, problem-based learning, small group teaching, work on a project
Assessment methodlecture – oral test, laboratory classes – evaluation of reports, project – evaluation of project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1recognizes basic functional blocks in structure of electric drive system
LO2analyzes power flow and energy losses in a simple drive system
LO3determines the basic properties of electric drive
LO4designs and simulates of simple electric drive
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1tests on lecture contentL
LO2assessment of the drive operation, evaluating of the student’s reports and performance in classesLC
LO3assessment of the drive operation, evaluating the student’s reports and performance in classesLC
LO4evaluating the student’s projectP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in laboratory classes15
participation in project30
preparation for laboratory classes, project30
working on reports, project30
preparation for exam10
TOTAL:130
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation603.0
Student workload – practical activities903.0
Basic references
  1. Weidauer J.: Electrical drives: principles, planning, applications, solutions. Publicis Publishing, Erlangen 2014.
  2. Mohan N.: Advanced electric drives: analysis, control and modeling using MATLAB/Simulink. John Willey & Sons, Hoboken 2014.
  3. Seung-Ki S.: Control of Electric Machine Drive Systems. IEEE Press, A John Willey & Sons, USA 2011.
  4. Alahakoon S.: Digital Control Techniques for Sensorless Electrical Drives. VDM Verlag Dr Muller, Germany 2009.
  5. Wilamowski B. M., Irwin J.D.: Control and Mechatronics. Taylor & Francis, USA 2011.
Supplementary references
  1. Seung-Ki S.: Control of Electric Machine Drive Systems. IEEE Press, A John Willey & Sons, USA, 2011.
  2. Leonard W.: Control of Electric Drives. 3rd Edition, Springer-Verlag, Berlin 2001.
  3. Alahakoon S.: Digital Control Techniques for Sensorless Electrical Drives. VDM Verlag Dr Muller, Germany 2009.
  4. Wilamowski B. M., Irwin J.D.: Control and Mechatronics. Taylor & Francis, USA 2011.
  5. Vukosavic S. N.: Digital Control of Electric Drives. Springer, 2007.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Andrzejewski, PhD Eng.26.02.2021

Electrical Circuits 1

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectrical Circuits 1Course codeIS-FEE-10004W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
1530150000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo receive the abilities to perform a simple analysis of linear DC and AC circuits contain up to two sources.
Course contentElement Constrains. Current and equivalent voltage on basic elements. Basic circuit analysis. Node-Voltage and Loop-Current Analysis. Thevenin equivalent circuits. Power of load and source. Analysis of resistive circuits with OA. Sinusoids and phasors. Phasor diagrams for simple circuits. Circuits analysis with phasors. Energy and power. Compensation of reactive power. The frequency analysis of RL, RC and RLC circuits.
Teaching methodsconsultations, self-work, discussions
Assessment methodProblems are presented for students at the beginning of semester. The evaluation is performing during personal discussion on several problems concerning all indicated topics.
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1uses the proper concepts from the electrical circuits domain
LO2describes the electrical features, dependences and parameters of basic elements of electric circuits
LO3defines and describes the dependences in resonant circuits
LO4calculates the currents, voltages and powers in DC and AC circuits also with the use of complex numbers
LO5applies the simulations to analyse of DC and AC circuits
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problemsL, C, LC
LO2evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problemsL, C
LO3evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessmentL, LC
LO4evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessmentC, L
LO5evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessmentC, LC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
attending the class sessions30
attending and providing the laboratory class experiments15
self-working on learning and preparing the problems solutions30
preparation for the experiments at laboratory class20
preparation for and participation in exams/tests25
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes and lecture15
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation753.0
Student workload – practical activities1006.0
Basic references
  1. Thomas R. E., Rosa A. J., Toussaint G. J.: The Analysis & Design of Linear Circuits. 6th ed, Wiley Inc. 2009.
  2. Tung L. J., Kwan B. W.: Circuit Analysis. World Scientific 2001.
  3. Irvin J. D., Nelms R. M.: Basic Engineering Circuits Analysis. International Student Version. John Willey & Sons, 2008.
  4. https://www.electrical4u.com/electrical-engineering-articles/circuit-theory/
  5. https://www.khanacademy.org/science/electrical-engineering
Supplementary references
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeJaroslaw Makal, Ph.D. Eng.10.01.2020

Electrical Machines 1

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectrical Machines 1Course codeIS-FEE-10005W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300001500No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesAchievement of skills of analysis of asynchronous machines and transformers.
Course contentTransformers: construction, principles of working, mathematical models. One-phase and three-phase transformers. Asynchronous motors: construction, principles of working, mathematical models. Transformations of co-ordinate systems, substitute scheme. Symmetrical steady state.
Teaching methodslecture, specialization workshop
Assessment methodlecture: written exam; specialization workshop: verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes construction and explains the principle of operation of transformers and induction machines
LO2identifies and suggests groups of connections of three-phase transformer, calculates voltages and currents in transformer windings
LO3interprets the behaviour of induction machines and transformers in various conditions (various voltage, frequency, load)
LO4illustrates different ways of startup and speed control of induction motors, calculates speed and current of induction motor in various work conditions (various voltage, frequency, load torque)
LO5describes the actual status and construction development trends in electrical machines
LO6associates the connection of electrical machines with other areas of knowledge in the discipline of electrical engineering
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1examL
LO2evaluating the student’s preparation for the classes, examL, SW
LO3evaluating the student’s preparation for the classes, examL, SW
LO4evaluating the student’s preparation for the classes, examL, SW
LO5examL
LO6examL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in the laboratory15
preparation for the laboratory15
description of laboratory reports15
participation in lectures30
preparing to pass the exam30
case studies/homeworks40
TOTAL:145
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation453.0
Student workload – practical activities453.0
Basic references
  1. Morris N.: Electrical & electronic engineering principles. Longman, 1994.
  2. Ryff P. F .L: Electric machinery. Prentice Hall, 1988.
  3. Wildi T.: Electrical machines, drives and power systems. Pearson Education, 2006.
Supplementary references
  1. Sen P. G.: Principles of electric machines and power electronics. J. Wiley & Sons, 1997.
  2. Chapman S. J.: Electric machinery fundamentals. Mc Graw Hill, 2005.
  3. Morris N. M.: Electrical and electronic engineering principles. Longman, 1994.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAdam Sołbut, Ph.D. Eng.07.02.2020

Electronics 1

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectronics 1Course codeIS-FEE-10006W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
1515300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo provide students with basic knowledge of electronic devices. To develop skills in analysis, design and testing of electronic circuits containing diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers.
Course contentDiodes – parameters, I-V characteristics, DC and AC models. Simple circuits containing diodes. Transistors (BJT, FET and MOSFET) – principles of operation, I-V characteristics, equivalent circuits. Transistor biasing. Single stage transistor amplifiers. Small signal analysis of amplifiers. Transistor as a switch. Parameters of operational amplifiers. Ideal OpAmp. Basic applications of operational amplifiers. Analysis and design of electronic devices and circuits using PSPICE.
Teaching methodslecture, class, laboratory class, computer simulations
Assessment methodlecture: written exam; class: two tests, laboratory class: evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the basic operation, characteristics and applications of diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers
LO2can apply knowledge of mathematics and engineering to analyze and design circuits containing diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers
LO3analyzes an electronic circuit using PSpice
LO4uses laboratory instruments for the measurement of circuit parameters and the data acquisition
LO5analyzes and interprets measurement data and prepares reports
LO6uses datasheets and application notes
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, testsL, LC
LO2written exam, testsL, C, LC
LO3verification of preparation for classesLC
LO4tests, evaluation of class workLC
LO5evaluation of reportsLC
LO6evaluation of class workLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in classes15
preparation for classes15
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes20
working on projects, reports25
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/laboratory classes5
preparation for and participation in exams/tests25
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation652.6
Student workload – practical activities1104.4
Basic references
  1. Sedra A.S., Smith K. C.: Microelectronic Circuits. Oxford University Press, 2004.
  2. Muret P.: Fundamentals of Electronics 1 : Electronic Components and Elementary Functions. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2017 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central).
Supplementary references
  1. Boysen E., Kybett H.: Complete Electronics Self-Teaching Guide with Projects. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2012 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central).
  2. Singh S.: Electronics Engineering. Alpha Science International, New Delhi, 2014 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central).
  3. Westcott S., Westcott J.R.: Basic Electronics: Theory and Practice. Mercury Learning & Information, 2015 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central).
  4. Saggio G.: Principless of analog electronic. CRC Press, 2014.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Karpiuk, Ph.D.23.02.2021

Fiberoptic Networks

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameFiberoptic NetworksCourse codeIS-FEE-10007W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
301500000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe principle objective of the course is to familiarize the students with the basic topics of fiberoptic networks: components, operation, measurements and design. Teaching and training skills of calculations necessary to analyse and design fiberoptic networks.
Course contentGeneral aspects of fiberopic networks. Network topologies. WDM networks. Passive and active components of the network. Noise and SNR. Dispersion. Non-linear effects. Chosen issues of design, contructing, measurements and operation of fiberoptic networks. Basic calculations in fiberoptic networks: energy budget, dispersion, SNR, ORL.
Teaching methodslecture, case studies, discussion
Assessment methodfinal test, case studies revision
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1lists basic elements and devices in fiberoptic networks and characterizes them shortly
LO2explains operating principles of main elements and devices in fiberoptic networks
LO3calculates selected parameters characterizing operation of a simple fiberoptic link
LO4can select one functional element in the fiberoptic network from the point of view of one specific feature of the system
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1final test, case studies evaluationL
LO2final test, case studies evaluationL
LO3final test, case studies evaluationC
LO4case studies evaluationC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture/consultations attendance30
participation in classes15
preparation for classes15
work on homeworks20
preparation for and participation in exam/tests30
TOTAL:110
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation452.5
Student workload – practical activities301.5
Basic references
  1. De Cusatis C.: Handbook of fiber optic data communication. Elsevier Academic Press, 2002.
  2. Zyskin J.: Optically amplified WDM networks. Elsevier Academic Press, 2011.
  3. Chomycz B.: Planning fiber optic networks. McGraw-Hill, 2009.
Supplementary references
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeUrszula Błaszczak, Ph.D. Eng.02.02.2020

Fundamentals of Control Engineering

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameFundamentals of Control EngineeringCourse codeIS-FEE-10008W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirementsmathematics, physics
Course objectivesIntroducing students to structures, tasks and methods of analysis and synthesis of simple control systems. Application of different methods of controllers design for control of simple processes
Course contentLecture: Laplace transforms of commonly encountered time function and basic Laplace transforms. Mathematical modelling of dynamic systems. Transient-response analysis of first and second-order systems. The correlation between transient and frequency-response and s-plane diagram. Stability of linear time-invariant systems. Hurwitz and Nyquist asymptotic stability criteria. Quality parameters of control on the basis of time and frequency domain performance specifications. Process control and the tuning of three-term controllers (analytical and experimental methods). Discrete time and computer control systems. Analytical techniques required for discrete time system analysis. Design methods for discrete time controllers. Nonlinear systems – practical aspects including relaycontrolled systems (PD and PID compensation). Laboratory class: Basic methods of identification, modelling and control of simple plants. Industry PID controllers, configuration and tuning methods. Control of nonlinear systems (with relay).
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class
Assessment methodwritten exam (lecture), evaluation of homework reports (laboratory class)
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has an elementary knowledge of analysis and synthesis methods of simple automatic control system and its constituent parts
LO2is capable of evaluating the quality specifications of control system and has an elementary knowledge of basic compensation methods of control system
LO3can describe procedures necessary for setting the parameters of three term controllers
LO4has some skills of identification and control of simple plants
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, evaluation of reportsL, LC
LO2written exam, evaluation of reportsL, LC
LO3written exam, evaluation of reportsL, LC
LO4evaluation of reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
individual work on lecture topics30
preparation for and participation in exams/tests15
laboratory class attendance30
preparation for laboratory class15
work on reports30
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation602.0
Student workload – practical activities1204.0
Basic references
  1. Ogata K.: Modern control engineering. Prentice-Hall International, 2004.
  2. Nise N.S.: Control Systems Engineering. 5th edition, Wiley, 2008.
  3. Åström K. J, Murray R. M.: Feedback Systems: An Introduction for Scientists and Engineers. Princeton University Press, 2008.
  4. Norman N. S.: Control systems engineering. 5th ed., John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2008.
Supplementary references
  1. Kaczorek T.: Linear Control Systems, vol. 1 and 2. Research Studies Press, 1993.
  2. Presentations for lecture (on-line available).
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeprof. Tadeusz Kaczorek, PhD Eng., Łukasz Sajewski, PhD Eng., Krzysztof Rogowski, PhD Eng.08.02.2020

Microprocessor Technique and Microcontrollers

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameMicroprocessor Technique and MicrocontrollersCourse codeIS-FEE-10009W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesKnowledge about the basic problems of the microprocessor technique and microcontrollers. Skills on programming of microprocessor systems in low-level and high-level languages.
Course contentLecture: Binary arithmetic. Basic topics of the microprocessor engineering. Microprocessor system structures and main components: processors, memories, basic peripheral devices, standard buses, additional circuits. Interrupt systems. Methods of input/output device service. Input/output binary and analogue devices. Exemplary microcontroller family: standard structure, instruction list, peripherals, interrupts, extensions. Laboratory classes: Practical exercises in programming of basic algorithms and I/O device service in machine- and high-level language.
Teaching methodslecture: presentations; laboratory classes: set of exercises
Assessment methodwritten exam and reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the activity of microprocessor, microcontrollers and whole microprocessor systemEEE_W07
LO2distinguishes: types of processors, interrupt systems, semiconductor memories, peripheral device service techniquesEEE_W07
LO3uses suitable programming toolsEEE_W03
LO4writes software servicing the microcontroller I/O devicesEEE_U07
LO5writes software implementation of designed algorithmEEE_U07
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam test on lecture contentL
LO2written exam test on lecture contentL
LO3evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO4evaluating the student’s reports and written testsLC
LO5evaluating the student’s reports and written testsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
individual work on lecture topics15
preparation for exam10
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes and drawing up reports40
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes10
preparation for laboratory classes tests10
exam and lab-classes tests attendance5
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation753.0
Student workload – practical activities823.0
Basic references
  1. Stallings W.: Computer Organization and Architecture. ISBN: 9780135160930; 896 p, Pearson, 2019.
  2. Ali Mazidi M., Naimi S., Naimi S.: The AVR Microcontroller and Embedded Systems. ISBN: 0138003319; 781 p, Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2011.
  3. Ball S.: Embedded Microprocessor Systems. ISBN: 0750675349; 432 p, Elsevier Newnes, 2002.
Supplementary references
  1. Grodzki L.: Presentations for lecture. Updated each semester.
  2. Grodzki L.: Manuals for laboratory classes. Updated each semester.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Control Engineering and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeLech Grodzki, PhD Eng15.02.2021

Modern Wireless Network Technologies

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameModern Wireless Network TechnologiesCourse codeIS-FEE-10010W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
30000000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesStudent is familiar with the main wireless network standards and distinguishing architectures.
Course contentClassification of the wireless networks. Wireless Internet protocol. Physical layer. Radiowave propagation. Antennas for wireless networks. Multipath propagation and transmission channel model. Noise and pulse interferences, ISI, radio receiver structure, equalizes. RAKE receivers. Coding and modulation. Space-time Block and trellis coding. Architecture of the GSM, GPRS, EDGE and UMTS. The spread-spectrum technology. Main standards. The OFDM and MIMO Technologies. Hybrid wireless systems.
Teaching methodslecture, presentation, disscusion
Assessment methodexam
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1is familiar with the main wireless network standards
LO2is familiar with distinguishing architectures and performance of wireless networks
LO3is familiar with the basics of radiowave propagation and transmission channel issues
LO4can asses implementation problems related to wireless networks
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam
LO2exam
LO3exam
LO4exam
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
homework20
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the class5
preparation for and participation in exam25
TOTAL:80
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation381.5
Student workload – practical activities201.0
Basic references
  1. Harte L., Bowler D.: Introduction to mobile telephone systems. Althos Publishing, 2003.
  2. Proakis J. G., Salehi M.: Communication systems engineering. Prentice-Hall, 2002.
  3. Haykin S.: Communications systems. J. Wiley & Sons, 2000.
Supplementary references
  1. Bellamy J.: Digital telephony. J. Wiley & Sons, 1982.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAdam Nikolajew, PhD.08.02.2020

Network Technologies

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameNetwork TechnologiesCourse codeIS-FEE-10011W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300150000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesObtaining knowledge of contemporary networking technologies and protocols used in local and backbone computer networks. Acquiring practical skills in setting up data transmission networks and configuring typical network devices.
Course contentThe history of development of Internet network. General foundations of computer networks architecture. Classification of networks and their basic topologies. Examples of network resources. Layered models of cooperating between network devices. The Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model (OSI). Network equipment: hubs, switches, routers, modems, gateways etc. Main and auxiliary network protocols: IP, TCP, UDP, ICMP, ARP, DHCP, DNS and other. Technologies and architectures of wired and wireless Local Area Networks (LAN): Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, Wi-Fi. Selected wide area (WAN) and metropolitan area (MAN) network technologies. Static and dynamic IP routing. Interior and exterior dynamic routing protocols: e.g. RIP, OSPF, BGP. Internet architecture. Interconnecting LAN and WAN networks. Access and backbone networks. Domain name system (DNS).
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class
Assessment methodlecture: tests; laboratory class: evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes, tests
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1distinguishing the basic physical and logical network topologies and explaining their properties
LO2describing of communication process using the layered model
LO3explaining the architecture and functionalities of technologies and devices used in wired and wireless local and wide area networks
LO4differentiating features and functions of main and auxiliary network protocols and practical checking of their operations using network analyzers
LO5describing the process of static and dynamic routing in IP networks
LO6setting up simple networks, configuring network settings in PC workstations and in network devices and checking their connectivity with other devices
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1tests on lecture contentL
LO2tests on lecture contentL
LO3tests on lecture contentL
LO4tests on lecture content, evaluating the student’s reports and performance in classesL, LC
LO5tests on lecture contentL
LO6evaluating the student’s reports and performance in classesLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in laboratory classes15
preparation for laboratoratory classes25
preparation for and participation in exams/tests60
TOTAL:130
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation451.5
Student workload – practical activities401.5
Basic references
  1. Kurose J. F., Ross K. W.: Computer networking: a top-down approach. Addison Wesley, 2009.
  2. Tanenbaum A. S.: Computer networks. Prentice Hall PTR, 2002.
  3. Comer D. E.: Computer networks and internets. Prentice Hall, 2008.
Supplementary references
  1. RFC documents (available on the Internet: http://www.rfc-editor.org).
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Zankiewicz, Ph.D. Eng.05.02.2020

Optical Fibers

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameOptical FibersCourse codeIS-FEE-10012W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300300000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesIntroduction to telecommunication systems. Learning the principles and methods for measuring properties of optical fiber components and systems. Learning determination the parameters of the optical fiber telecommunication link. Education application rules and service of specialized measurement equipment.
Course contentTelecommunications systems. Measurements of physical parameters of optical fibers. Measurements of optical fiber components. Measurements of attenuation of optical fibers. Reflectometric measurements of optical fiber telecommunication link. Power distribution in optical fibers (transverse modes). Spectral attenuation. Optical fibers connectors.
Teaching methodslecture, presentation, discussion, laboratory experiments
Assessment methodevaluation of reports, tests of preparation for laboratory exercise
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1measures the physical parameters of optical fibers
LO2measures the spectral characteristics of optical fiber
LO3uses and configures specialized measurement equipment (optical fiber technology)
LO4analyzes the parameters of optical fiber systems
LO5classifies and summarizes the elements of the optical fiber, specifying their functionality in telecommunication systems
LO6measures the parameters of optical fiber
LO7applies the principles of health and safety required for working with radiation in the range of NIR
LO8understands the need and knows the possibilities of continuous training in the field of photonics
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classesLC
LO2evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classesLC
LO3evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classesLC
LO4evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes, examL, LC
LO5evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes, examL, LC
LO6evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classesLC
LO7evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classesLC
LO8evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes, examL, LC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in the labolatory sessions30
participation in the labolatory sessions30
development of laboratory reports and/or completion of homework assignments45
participation in consultations related to the exercise5
attending lecture, student – teacher sessions30
TOTAL:140
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation652.0
Student workload – practical activities753.0
Basic references
  1. Ghatak A. K., Thyagarajan K.: Introduction to fiber optics. Cambridge University Press, 2000.
  2. Hecht J.: Understanding fiber optics. Pearson Prentice Hall, 2002.
  3. Digonnet M.: Rare earth doped fiber lasers and amplifiers. Marcel Decker, 2001.
Supplementary references
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeJacek Żmojda, PhD. DSc.30.01.2020

Power Electronics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course namePower ElectronicsCourse codeIS-FEE-10013W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
30000000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo acquaint with basic power electronics devices and different types of converters (DC/DC, AC/DC, DC/AC, AC/AC 1- and 3-phases) and its control. The acquire of skills to different types converter operation analyze.
Course contentPower semiconductor devices (SCR, BJT, MOSFET, IGBT). Single and three phases controlled rectifiers with different type of load. The rectifier influence on the net, active, reactive and distortion powers. The DC/AC and AC/DC converters – structures and control. The transistors matrix converter controlled by PWM methods. 2- and 4-quadrant DC-DC converters. Vectorial model of 3-phases converter.
Teaching methodslecture, specialization workshop
Assessment methodlecture: written exam; specialization workshop: evaluation of reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1lists, clasiffies and discusses operation of basic power electronic converters
LO2discusses properties of the power electronic devices
LO3describes present state and developmental trends of the power electronics
LO4analyses and evaluates operation of selected types converter on the base of test results
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written and oral examL
LO2written and oral examL
LO3written and oral examL
LO4written and oral examL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the lecture10
preparation for and participation in exams35
TOTAL:75
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation421.5
Student workload – practical activities00.0
Basic references
  1. Rashid H. M.: Power electronics handbook : devices, circuits, and applications. Academic Press, 2007.
  2. Mazda F.: Power electronics handbook. Elsevier, 2003.
  3. Erickson R. W., Maksimowic D.: Fundamentals of power electronics. Kulwer Academic, 2001.
  4. Rarnes M.: Practical variable speed drives and power electronics. Elsevier, 2003.
Supplementary references
  1. Bin Wo: Power conversion and control of wind energy system. J. Wiley & Sons, 2011.
  2. Benysek G.: Improvement in the quality of delivery of electrical energy using power electronics systems. Springer, 2007.
  3. Wilamowski B. M., Irwin J. D.: Power electronics and motor drives – the industrial electronics handbook. Taylor and Francis, 2005.
  4. Strzelecki R., Benysek G.: Power electronics in smart electrical energy networks. Springer, 2008
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAgata Godlewska20.01.2020

Power Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course namePower SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10014W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
30000000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesGetting knowledge of power system operation under normal and abnormal conditions. Getting knowledge of per unit system and symmetrical components method to be used in power system analysis. Getting knowledge of the methods and approaches to be used in analysis of load flow, faults and transients analysis.
Course contentIntroduction to power systems. General requirements and conditions in power system operation. Fundamentals of power generation, transmission and distribution. The per-unit system and symmetrical components Power flow analysis. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults analysis. Power system transients. Voltage and power control. Protective relays. Individual solving of four case studies which involves: per unit system, and symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.
Teaching methodslecture, case studies
Assessment methodfinal test, case studies revision
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knows and understands the issue of power system operation under normal and abnormal conditions
LO2is able to gather the information based on different sources involving power system operation under normal and abnormal conditions
LO3is able to apply the different methods and approaches to power system analysis purposes
LO4is able to work on the subject individually
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1final test, case studies evaluationL
LO2final test, case studies evaluationL
LO3final test, case studies revisionL
LO4final test, case studies evaluationL
LO5case studies evaluationL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationattending the class sessions30
elaboration of case studies30
preparation for and participation in exams/tests15
TOTAL:75
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities301.0
Basic references
  1. Grigsby L. L.: Power Systems. CRC Press, 2007.
  2. Kothari D. P., Nagroth I. J.: Modern Power System Analysis. McGraw-Hill, 2008.
  3. Wayne B. H., Santoso S.: Handbook of electric power calculations. McGraw-Hill Education, New York 2015.
  4. Bevtani H., Watanabe M., Mitani Y.: Power system monitoring and control. John Wiley & Sons, 2014.
  5. Gonen T.: Modern power system analysis. CRC/Taylor & Francis, 2013.
  6. Yoshihide H.: Handbook of power systems engineering with power electronics applications. John Wiley & Sons, 2013.
  7. Glover D. J., Sarma M., Overbye T. J.: Power system analysis and design. Cengage Learning, 2012.
  8. Grigsby L. L.: Power systems. CRC/Taylor & Francis, 2012.
  9. Grigsby L. L.: Electric power generation, transmission and distribution. CRC/Taylor & Francis, 2012.
  10. Gomez-Exposito A., Conejo A., Canizares C.: Electric Energy systems: analysis and operation. CRC/Taylor & Francis 2009.
  11. Crappe M.: Electric power systems. ISTE, John Wiley & Sons, 2008.
  12. El-Hawary M. E.: Introduction to electrical power systems. John Wiley & Sons, 2008.
  13. Gonen T.: Electric power distribution system engineering. CRC/Taylor & Francis, 2008.
  14. Xi-Fan Wang, Yonghua Song, Irving M.: Modern power systems analysis. Springer, 2008.
  15. Grigsby L. L.: Power systems. CRC/Taylor & Francis 2007.
  16. Saadat H.: Power system analysis. McGraw-Hill, 2004.
Supplementary references
  1. Crow M.: Computational methods for electric power systems. CRC Press, 2003.
  2. Kothari D. P., Nagrath I. J.: Modern power system analysis. McGraw-Hill, 2003.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeRobert Sobolewski, PhD.02.02.2020

Programmable Logic Controllers

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameProgrammable Logic ControllersCourse codeIS-FEE-10015W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150300000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis course will provide the basic technical skills and knowledge necessary to work with programmable logic controllers typically found in an industrial environment.
Course contentIndustrial control systems. Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC): classification, structure, selection, configuration. PLC programming languages. Input/Output devices (switches, sensors, relays, solenoids etc.). PLC communication with I/O devices. Sequential Control Structure. Industrial networks – Profibus and Profinet. Visualization of industrial processes – Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems. Human–machine interface (HMI). PLC programming software. HMI software.
Teaching methodspresentation and lecture, practical work, reports
Assessment methodlecture – tests; laboratory classes – evaluation of reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1explains the purpose of various components of industrial control systems
LO2creates the control algorithm based on machine and process description
LO3describes the basic structure and operation of the PLC
LO4applies appropriate engineering tools for control application, visualization, configuration and parameterization selected PLC
LO5writes PLC program and HMI program
LO6executes and test the application on a set composed of PLC, HMI and the process model
LO7prepares the technical documentation and present the results
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1testsL, LC
LO2testsL, LC
LO3testsL, LC
LO4evaluation of reportsLC
LO5evaluation of reportsLC
LO6evaluation of reportsLC
LO7evaluation of reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
individual work on lecture topics20
preparation for and participation in exams/tests20
laboratory class attendance30
preparation for laboratory class20
work on reports30
TOTAL:135
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation451.5
Student workload – practical activities953.5
Basic references
  1. Kręglewska U., Ławryńczuk M., Marusak P.: Control laboratory exercises. Oficyna Wydawnicza PW, Warszawa 2007.
  2. Erickson K. T.: Programmable Logic Controllers: An Emphasis on Design and Application. 2nd Ed, Dogwood Valley Press 2011.
  3. Roebuck K.: SCADA: High-impact Strategies – What You Need to Know: Definitions, Adoptions, Impact, Benefits. Mat, 2011.
Supplementary references
  1. Clements-Jewery K., Jeffcoat W. : The PLC Workbook: programmable logic controllers made easy. Prentice-Hall, London 1996.
  2. Bolton W.: Programmable Logic Controllers (Fourth Edition). Elsevier, London 2006.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and ElectronicsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Ruszewski PhD Eng. DSc.08.02.2020

Protection against interference

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameProtection against interferenceCourse codeIS-FEE-10016W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesKnowledge on basic phenomena related to generation, propagation, basic methods of measurement and study of disturbing electromagnetic signals, their influence on electronic and electrical equipment and systems. Knowledge on on functioning of elements and devices or methods of protection of electronic and electric equipment and systems against various types of disturbing electromagnetic signals. Skills of selection and application of basic protection measures against main types of disturbances. Skills of planning and performing measurements of disturbing signals, their propagation and coupling effects and basic characteristics and parameters of protective elements and devices. Skills of using measurement equipment. Skills of elaboration, illustration, analysis and interpretation of measurement results.
Course contentLecture: Basic terms and definitions. Sources of disturbing electromagnetic signals and their characteristics. Characteristics of disturbing signals in electrical installations and signal transmission lines. Ways of disturbing effects of various electromagnetic signals, electromagnetic couplings, travelling waves. Elements and devices for protection against interference in electrical installations and signal transmission lines. Equipotentialization, cable routing, screening techniques. Zone concept of complex protection against interference. Laboratory class: Introduction. Electrostatic discharge (ESD) – method of ESD testing and measurements of characteristics of ESD impulse currents. Investigation of travelling wave phenomena in electrically long lines and wires. Measurements of electromagnetic coupling effects between various cables. Estimation of threat connected with voltages and currents induced due to impulse electromagnetic field in various cables and antennas. Measurements and testing of protective electrical characteristics and parameters of basic types of protective elements and devices, e.g. power mains filters,gas discharge tubes,varistors and other elements and devices used for surge protection in electrical installation and signal transmission lines.
Teaching methodslecture and laboratory class
Assessment methodlecture: written or oral exam; laboratory class: evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1characterizes main sources of disturbances and rates levels of threat which they provide; plans and performs studies and measuremets of basic characteristics and effects of various types of disturbances
LO2has detailed knowledge on rules of functioning, basic characteristics and parameters of typical elements and devices used for protection against different type disturbances; plans measurements of basic electrical characteristics and parameters of protective devices
LO3can use catalogue cards for selection of proper devices or systems to provide appropriate protection against interference
LO4plans and prepares protocols that document the measurements and studies
LO5elaborates, analyses and illustrates of the results of performed studies and measurements
LO6interprets, compares and rates the performed measurement results
LO7applies rules of safety and hygiene of work
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam on lecture content,evaluation of student’s reports and performance at classesL, LC
LO2exam on lecture content,evaluation of student’s reports and performance at classesL, LC
LO3exam on lecture content, presentation of selected topic or problemL
LO4evaluation of student’s reports and performance at classesL, LC
LO5evaluation of student’s reports and performance at classesLC
LO6evaluation of student’s reportsLC
LO7evaluation of student’s reports and performance at classesLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in laboraatory classes30
participation for laboraatory classes20
work in reports from laboratory classes24
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the lecture5
participation in student-teacher sessions related to laboratory classes5
preparation and performance of presentation on selected topic14
preparation for and participation in exam24
TOTAL:152
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation742.5
Student workload – practical activities793.0
Basic references
  1. Ott H. W.: Electromagnetic compatibility engineering. Wiley, 2009.
  2. Williams T.: EMC for systems and installations. Newnes, 2000.
  3. Hasse P.: Overvoltage protection of low voltage systems. IEEE Press, 2004.
  4. Latturo F.: Electromagnetic compatibility in power systems. Elsevier, 2007.
  5. Joffe E. B., Lock K. S.: Grounds for grounding. A circuit-to-system handbook. IEEE Press, 2010.
Supplementary references
  1. Wiliams T., Amstrong K.: Installations cabling and earthing technique for EMC. 2002.
  2. Sengupta D. L.: Applied electromagnetics and electromagnetic compatibility. Wiley, 2006.
  3. Hasse P., Wiesinger J.: Blitzschutz der elektronik. Risikoanalyse, planen und ausfuhren nach neuen normen der reihe DIN VDE 0185. VDE Verlag, 1999.
  4. Raab V.: Überspannungsschutz in verbrauscheranlagen. Auswahl, errichtung, prüsfung. Verlag Technik 1998.
  5. Kaiser K. L.: Electromagnetic compatibility handbook. CRS Press 2005.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and LightDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeRenata Markowska, PhD. DSc. Eng07.02.2020

Radioelectronic Devices

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronics EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameRadioelectronic DevicesCourse codeIS-FEE-10017W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe principal objective of lectures is to cover the fundamentals of main radioelectronics circuits (amplifiers, oscillators, frequency multipliers, mixers) and analogue modulation (AM,FM,PM modulations, modulators and demodulators structures). The basis of superheterodyne receivers are presented.
Course contentStatic and dynamic characteristics. Approximation characteristics of active elements. Classes and regimes of work. Analysis of work of resonance power amplifier. Frequency multipliers. LC and crystal oscillators. Amplitude modulation. AM modulators and demodulators. Angle modulations – FM and PM. FM modulators and demodulators. Frequency mixers. Superheterodyne receiver idea.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class
Assessment methodlecture: oral exam, two small tests during lecture, evaluation of homeworks; laboratory class: evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has a knowledge of work principles of basis radioelectronic devices
LO2has a knowledge of principles of modulation and demodulations
LO3has a skill of frequency spectrum measurements
LO4has a skill of measurements of radioelectronic devices characteristics
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the student’s reports and preparation for the classesL
LO2evaluating the student’s reports and preparation for the classes, tests on lecture contentL,LC
LO3evaluating the student’s reports, tests on lecture contentL,LC
LO4evaluating the student’s reports, tests on lecture contentL,LC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in laboratory classes30
participation in laboratory classes15
preparation for laboratory reports30
preparation reports from homeworks30
preparation for and participation in exams/tests20
TOTAL:155
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation602.0
Student workload – practical activities753.0
Basic references
  1. Li Chi-Hsi R.: RF circuit design. Wiley, 2008.
  2. Grebennikov A.: RF and microwave power amplifier design. McGraw-Hill, 2005.
  3. Hagen J. B.: Radio-frequency electronics. Circuits and applications. Cambridge University, 2009.
Supplementary references
  1. Sorrentino R., Bianchi G.: Microwave and RF engineering. Wiley, 2010.
  2. Whitaker J.C.: The RF transmission systems handbook. CRC Press, 2002.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMaciej Sadowski, Ph. D. Eng.13.02.2020

Radio and Television Devices

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameRadio and Television DevicesCourse codeIS-FEE-10018W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe principal objective of lectures is to cover the fundamentals of work and structures of radio and television receivers and radio communication transceivers. The CD and DVD basis of works, and introduction to some elements of electroacoustic are presented.
Course contentSuperheterodyne receiver. ZIF (Zero Intermediate Frequency) receiver. Main functional blocks of radio receiver. Signals in radio receiver – analysis in MATLAB. Stereophony and stereo modulation. Digital radiocommunication transceivers. Analysis structure of radio receivers and mobile phones. IC for radiocommunication blocks. RDS system. Television receiver – main functional blocks. RFID systems. CD, DVD. Electroacoustic elements loudspeakers, headphones, microphones.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class, specialization workshop
Assessment methodlecture: oral exam, two small tests during lecture; laboratory class: tests, evaluation of reports; specialization workshop: evaluation of report
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has a knowledge of work principles of basis transceivers structures
LO2has a knowledge of principles of electroacoustic elements
LO3has some skills of the measurement methods of radio receiver blocks
LO4has some skills of the measurement methods of electroacoustic elements
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the student’s reports and preparation for the classesLC
LO2evaluating the student’s reports and preparation for the classes, tests on lecture contentL, LC
LO3evaluating the student’s reports, tests on lecture contentL, LC, SW
LO4evaluating the student’s reports, tests on lecture contentL, LC. SW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
preparation for and participation in exams/tests30
participation in laboratory classes30
participation in laboratory classes15
preparation for laboratory reports30
TOTAL:135
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation602.0
Student workload – practical activities602.0
Basic references
  1. Coleman C.: An introduction to radio frequency engineering. Cambridge University Press, 2004.
  2. Egan W. F.: Practical RF system design. J. Wiley & Sons, 2003.
  3. Quizheng Gu: RF system design of transceivers for wireless communications. Springer, 2006.
  4. Lozano-Nieto A.: RFID design fundamentals and applications. CRC Press, 2010.
  5. Glen B.: Electroacoustic devices: microphones and loudspeakers. Focal Press, 2010.
Supplementary references
  1. Sorrentino R., Bianchi G.: Microwave and RF engineering. Wiley, 2010.
  2. Whitaker J. C.:The RF transmission systems handbook. CRC Press, 2002.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMaciej Sadowski, Ph. D. Eng.13.02.2020

Wireless Transmission Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronics EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameWireless Transmission SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10019W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
30000000No. of ECTS credits2
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo acquaint students with the techniques used to transmit information in wireless systems. To acquaint students with the architecture, principles of operation and application of modern wireless systems.
Course contentDecibel calculation in radiocommunication. Ranges and properties of radio waves used in wireless communication. Basics of radio wave propagation. Radio wave propagation in free space. The structure and characteristics of the radio link. Radiocommunication equation. Bases of antenna array operation. Mathematical description of multiport radio devices. Impedance, admittance and dissipation matrices in the description of the properties of wireless devices. The matching of radio devices. Rayleigh ratio. Basics of operation of various types of commonly used wireless systems – architecture, principle of operation, radio channels, application. Satellite systems, trunking systems, cellular systems.
Teaching methodslecture
Assessment methodexam and evaluation of reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has knowledge about radio wave propagation
LO2has knowledge about techniques used for transmission information in wireless systems
LO3has knowledge about structure, operation, mathematical description of multiport radio devices
LO4has knowledge about operation of antenna arrays
LO5has knowledge about operation of commonly used wireless systems
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam on lecture contentL
LO2exam on lecture contentL
LO3exam on lecture contentL
LO4exam on lecture contentL
LO5evaluation of reports and presentation of selected topicL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
preparation reports from homeworks15
preparation for and participation in exams/tests15
TOTAL:60
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities150.5
Basic references
  1. Siwiak K.: Radiowave propagation and antennas for personal communications. Artech House, 2007.
  2. Saunders S.: Antennas and propagation for wireless communications systems. Wiley & Sons, 2007.
  3. Rohde U.: RF/microwave circuit design for wireless applications. Wiley & Sons, 2013.
Supplementary references
  1. Fujimoto K., James J. R.: Mobile antenna system handbook. Artech House, 1994.
  2. Sorrentino R., Bianchi G.: Microwave and RF engineering. Wiley & Sons, 2010.
  3. Randy L.: Antenna arrays : a computational approach. Wiley & Sons, 2010.
  4. Rhee M.Y.: Mobile communication systems and security. Wiley & Sons, 2009.
  5. Maral G., Bousquet M.: Satellite communications systems. Wiley & Sons, 2002.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMarek Garbaruk, Ph.D. Eng.20.02.2021

Microcontrollers in Applications

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameMicrocontrollers in ApplicationsCourse codeIS-FEE-10020W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
00300000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTeaching the development and testing of practical and advanced applications using microcontrollers and electronic components.
Course contentFundamentals programming of microcontrollers with ARM core. Practical I/O port operations. Alphanumeric and graphical display applications. Determination of the tilt using a MEMS sensor. Generating a multi-channel PWM signal to control the robot arm (model AL5A). Communication with GPS receiver. Using Bluetooth technology for remote voltage measurements. DC motor control. Implementation of color recognition system. DAC converter application to audio playback.
Teaching methodslaboratory classes, presentation, disscusion, specialization workshop
Assessment methodevaluation of partial reports from the set of exercises
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the operation of modern microcontrollers
LO2uses appropriate integrated development tools
LO3creates and verifies software supporting peripherals of the selected microcontroller
LO4implements the prepared algorithm of program operation
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
LO2evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
LO3evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
LO4evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationpreparation for the laboratory30
description of laboratory reports20
participation in lab sessions or student-teacher consultations30
prepare to pass the module20
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities1004.0
Basic references
  1. Bansod T., Tawde P.: Microcontroller Programming (8051, PIC, ARM7 ARM Cortex). Shroff Publisher, 2017.
  2. Martin T.: The insider’s guide to the Philips ARM7-based microcontrollers. Hitex, 2005.
  3. Predko M.: Programming and Customizing the ARM7 Microcontroller. McGraw-Hill, 2011.
  4. Touluson R., Wilmshurst T.: Fast and Effective Embedded Systems Design :
  5. Warwick A. S.: C Programming for Embedded Microcontrollers. Elektor Publishing, 2009.
  6. Warwick A. S.: ARM Microcontroller Interfacing: Hardware and Software. Elektor Publishing, 2010
Supplementary references
  1. Kociszewski R.: Laboratory Guide. Course website.
  2. LPC 214x – User manual. Philips Semiconductors 2004.
  3. Hohl W.: ARM Assembly Language. Fundamentals and Techniques. CRC Press, 2014.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeRafał Kociszewski, Ph.D. Eng.24.02.2021

Final Project

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameFinal ProjectCourse codeIS-FEE-10021W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
0000000No. of ECTS credits12
Entry requirements5/6 semesters of engineer level in appropriate area
Course objectivesFamiliriazing student with the methodology of solving engineer problems. Deepening skills of appropriate choice and use of literature references and the skill of use of scientific and technical data bases. Training the ability of analyzing the literature to identify the possible solutions of the problem stated in the engineer project. Obtaining the skill of formulating the engineer problem and the choice of the methodology and tools to solve it (including calculation tools and computer programmes). Achieving the skill of preparing plan and schedule of the process of the engineer task realization. Improving skill of preparing the report of the engineer task realization. Creating the skill of the design assumptions' verification, concluding and evaluation of achieved results.
Course contentKnowledge and skills connected with the subject of the project – acquisition of information from the literature. Characterization of the possible solutions of the problem stated in the engineer project derived from the current state of knowledge. Knowledge of the development trends within the chosen area allowing to choose the solution of the problem. Planning the realization of the engineer problem. Using computer tools and techniques in order to realize or support the solution of the task. Verification of the solution by means of the methods and tools of theoretical and experimental analysis. Methodology of characterization and analyzing the engineer task and forming the conclusions. Development of the results and the documentation of executed tasks.
Teaching methodsdiscussion, consultations
Assessment methodevaluation of the final project by the tutor and evaluator, evaluation of the defence of the final project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1collects knowledge from the literature and evaluates the applicability to solve chosen technical problem
LO2indyvidually plans the solution of the engineer problem, specifying the method and the execution time
LO3implements engineering task and prepares the development containing documentation and verification of the results
LO4formulates objectives for the various stages of solving engineering tasks, suggesting methods of implementation and verification of a solution
LO5can design a measurement system implementing engineering design or research task
LO6can evaluate relevance and use appropriate methods and tools used to achieve engineering tasks
LO7has the ability and understands the need to improve his/hers qualifications in order to enhance and update expertise technical knowledge
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO2positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO3positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO4positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO5positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO6positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO7positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationself work on the subject, consultations, discussions with the supervisor300
TOTAL:300
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation150.5
Student workload – practical activities30012.0
Basic references
  1. specialized literature – adequate to the subject of the project.
Supplementary references
Organisational unit conducting the courseFaculty of Electrical EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeteachers of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering15.02.2020

Image Processing and Recognition

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameImage Processing and RecognitionCourse codeIS-FEE-10022W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150003000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo familiarize students with the knowledge of digital images, methods of their processing and recognition.
Course contentLecture: Introduction to basic information about image and image processing methods: mathematical model of the image, the creation of digital images, disturbance models, image histogram alignment, context filters, morphological transformations, contouring and segmentation algorithms. Image compression and decompression methods. Image recognition tasks, application of image analysis systems. Classification of recognition methods: minimum distance methods, pattern methods, approximation methods, special methods, probabilistic methods, tree methods, graph methods. Cluster analysis and classification in the feature space. Examples of image recognition systems: face recognition systems, vision systems. Specialization workshop: Testing and evaluation of selected image processing procedures on given digital images. Application of selected image processing methods. Selection of image features and recognition methods for selected classes of objects. Testing and evaluation of selected recognition methods on given images. Presentation of individual tasks of selecting image processing procedures and methods of recognizing and assessing their quality for selected classes of objects.
Teaching methodsinformative and problem lecture, discussions, implementation of projects
Assessment methodlecture – written test; specialization workshop – evaluation of projects, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knows the basic concepts of the description of digital images, lists and classifies them
LO2can identifies methods and techniques for processing and recognizing digital images
LO3can cites and uses the basic procedures for processing digital images
LO4can interprets the results of digital image processing
LO5can assess the quality of image analysis methods used
LO6is ready to work in a team, think and act creatively
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written test on lecture contentL
LO2written test on lecture contentL
LO3written test on lecture content; evaluating the student’s reportsL, SW
LO4evaluating the student’s reportsSW
LO5evaluating the student’s reportsSW
LO6discussion on the project, observation of student’s work in classesSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in seminar workshop30
preparation for seminar workshop15
completion of project tasks (including work on reports)20
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes5
preparation for and participation in the final test20
TOTAL:105
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation502.0
Student workload – practical activities853.0
Basic references
  1. Russ J., Neal B.: The image processing handbook. CRC Press, Boca Raton 2017.
  2. McAndrew A.: A computational introduction to digital image processing. CRC/Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton 2016.
  3. Shih F.: Image processing and pattern recognition: fundamentals and techniques. IEEE Press, John Wiley & Sons, 2010.
Supplementary references
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeGrażyna Gilewska, Ph. D.28.02.2021

SQL Based Data Analysis and Reporting

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyEngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameSQL Based Data Analysis and ReportingCourse codeIS-FEE-10023W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150015000No. of ECTS credits2
Entry requirementsprogramming – basic engineering level
Course objectivesKnowledge and understanding of the basics of SQL databases. Creation of reporting systems using MSSQL functions and procedures.
Course contentIntroduction to SQL and T-SQL. Introduction to Tables. Introduction to Data Selection.
Teaching methodslecture and discussion, project
Assessment methodlecture – exam; project – creation of a reporting system using MSSQL T-SQL extension
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knowledge of the basics of SQL databases
LO2knowledge of the basics of MSSQL T-SQL extension
LO3knowledge of the principles of proper preparation of reports and is able to analyze them
LO4preparing, testing and running own scripts for data acquisition, processing and analysis
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam, partial evaluation of projectL, P
LO2exam, partial evaluation of projectL, P
LO3exam, partial evaluation of projectL, P
LO4exam, partial evaluation of projectL, P
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture15
classes15
preparation for project6
creation of data analysis and reporting system20
TOTAL:56
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation300.0
Student workload – practical activities00.0
Basic references
  1. Molinaro A.: SQL Cookbook. O’Reilly and Associates, 1. Edition.
  2. Shields W.: SQL QuickStart Guide: The Simplified Beginner’s Guide to Managing, Analyzing, and Manipulating Data With SQL. ClydeBank Media LLC, Illustrated Edition.
  3. Ben-Gan I.: T-SQL Fundamentals. Microsoft Press. 3rd edition.
Supplementary references
  1. Linoff G. S.: Data Analysis Using SQL and Excel. Wiley, 2. Edition
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMaciej Ciężkowski, Ph. D.12.02.2021

Physics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyEngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course namePhysicsCourse codeIS-FEE-10024W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
303000000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirementsMathematics
Course objectivesKnowledge and understanding of the basic laws of the classical physics and selected elements of the modern physics. Acquiring the skills to solve the physics problems.
Course contentLecture: 1. Basic laws of classical mechanics. Inertial and non-inertial frames. Galilean transformation. The law of universal gravitation. 2. Harmonic vibrations. Damped vibrations. Forced vibrations. 3. Mechanical waves, acoustic waves. Wave interference. Doppler effect. 4. Geometric and wave optics. 5. Electricity and magnetism. Maxwell’s equations. Electromagnetic waves. 6. Basics of modern physics. Perfect black body, external photoelectric effect, Compton effect. Bohr Atomic Model. Classes: Solving problems in the field of classical mechanics, geometric and wave optics, wave and vibrating motion, electricity and magnetism.
Teaching methodslecture and discussion, classes
Assessment methodlecture – exam;
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the meaning of the basic principles of physics
LO2assigns the relevant principles and rules for existing problems
LO3uses the learned physical laws to solve
LO4analyzes and solves the engineering problems with the use of physical approach
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1examL
LO2partial evaluation of problems solutionsL, C
LO3partial evaluation of problems solutionsL, C
LO4partial evaluation of problems solutionsL, C
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture30
classes30
preparation for classes15
work on solutions of selected physics problems25
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation602.0
Student workload – practical activities702.5
Basic references
  1. Halliday D., Resnick R.: Physics 1 and Physics 2. Wiley, 3rd edition.
  2. Feynman R. P., Leighton R. B., Sands M.: The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Basic Books. New Millennium ed. Edition
  3. https://openstax.org/details/books/university-physics
Supplementary references
  1. Halliday D., Resnick R., Walker J.: Fundamentals of Physics. John Wiley & Sons, 7th edition.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMaciej Ciężkowski, Ph. D.12.02.2021

Electrical Equipment and Installations

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectrical Equipment and InstallationsCourse codeIS-FEE-10028W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
1501530000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirementsElectrical Circuits, 1, 2 or equivalent
Course objectivesTo familiarize students with the construction equipment and low voltage electrical installations. Learning the basic principles of the selection of electrical equipment in normal operating conditions and fault conditions. To know the principles and criteria of the dimension of electric shock protections in low and high voltage installations. Education rules for the use of diagnostic equipment and conduct testing of electrical equipment with the basic physical phenomena occurring in them. To familiarize students with rules preparation of technical documentation for the electrical installation.
Course contentComplete with module content:Environment of electrical equipment. Standardization and typification. Insulation of electrical equipment. Work and short currents. Impedance of electric power system elements. Thermal effect of work and short currents. Electromagnetic effect of short currents. Electrical arc and arc interruption. Switches. Short currents suppresion. Measuring transformers. Low-voltage power networks. Voltage range of an electrical installations. Selection of electrical devices. Live potection conductors against overcurrent. Supply of buildings. Electrical installations of buildings. Requirements for special installations, locations (construction and demolation site of buildings, caravan parks, swimming pools). Design principles of electrical installations. Switch in low voltage installation. Cables and conductors of electric power system. Selection of conductors.
Teaching methodslecture, discussion, experiment, presentation
Assessment methodlecture – written exam; project – completion, presentation and discussion of the project, laboratory – written test, reports from laboratory
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knows the basic requirements of the applicable regulations for the construction and selection of equipment in electrical installations
LO2knows and understands the electrical design methodology
LO3knows the basic rules of dimensioning of electric shock protections and safety rules for the use of equipment and electrical installations
LO4executes basic operations research of installations and electrical equipment
LO5applies the principles of safety rules when testing electrical equipment and installations
LO6students can work in a team, able to develop and implement a schedule of work required to achieve the objective
LO7students can design and compare the basic systems of electrical installations, including the selected utility and economic criteria, using appropriate methods, techniques and tools
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1lecture exam, projectL, P
LO2project and performance in project’s classesP
LO3lecture exam, project, raport from laboratoryL, P, LC
LO4evaluating the student’s reports,working on the project, working on the laboratory classP, LC
LO5evaluating the student’s projectP
LO6evaluating the student’s project, discussion of the student’s project, raport from laboratory, working on the laboratory classP, LC
LO7project and performance in project’s classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc.45
preparation for classes, laboratory classes, projects, seminars, etc.15
working on projects, reports, etc.25
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project5
implementation of project tasks30
preparation for and participation in exams/tests21
TOTAL:156
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation662.5
Student workload – practical activities1004.0
Basic references
  1. Seip G. G.: Electrical Installations Handbook. 3rd ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2000.
  2. Atkinson B.: Electrical installation design. 4th ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2013.
  3. Standards IEC 60364: Low voltage installations.
  4. Electrical installation guide. According to IEC international standards. Schneider Electric, 2016.
Supplementary references
  1. Electrical installation handbook. Protection, control and electrical devices. Technical guide. 6th ed., ABB Sace, 2010.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMarcin Andrzej Sulkowski Ph.D. Eng.20.02.2018

Field Programmable Gate Arrays

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameField Programmable Gate ArraysCourse codeIS-FEE-10031W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150300000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe target of this course is to introduce the students to the structural design of FPGAs in the way, which is appropriate for both programmers and hardware engineers.
Course contentInternal FPGAs architecture, clock signal frequency synthesis, signal I/O standards. CAD software for designing FPGAs – Intel Quartus II software. Design flow of FPGAs. VHDL: fundamentalunits, librarydeclarations, entity, architecture. Concurrent code. Sequential code.State machines. Packages and components. Functions and procedures. IEEE standard packages. Techniques description of the project, simulation, implementation and programming of FPGAs. Constructing a digital circuit using FPGAs. Synthesis of complex hierarchical designs. Synthesis of digital systems using standard prototype modules. Support for external devices via FPGA: PWM signal modulation, I2C and SPI bus control.
Teaching methodsdescribes the basic features and properties of FPGAs,
Assessment methodlecture – test, laboratory classes – evaluation of reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the basic features and properties of FPGAs
LO2recognizes the syntax of the VHDL statements
LO3uses the features of the CAD FPGA platform
LO4designs simple digital systems in programmable structures
LO5uses VHDL to describe the system and designs new components
LO6combines various description techniques to design complex systems
LO7can run a simple digital system using conventional prototype modules
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the student’s testL
LO2evaluating the student’s testL
LO3evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO4evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO5evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO6evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO7evaluating the student’s reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes20
working on reports15
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes and laboratory classes5
preparation for and participation in test15
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation471.5
Student workload – practical activities702.5
Basic references
  1. Floyd L. T.: Digital Fundamentals with PLD Programming. Prentice Hall, 2005.
  2. Pedroni V. A.: Circuit Design with VHDL. MIT, Cambridge, London 2004.
  3. Jha N. K., Gupta S.: Testing of Digital Systems. Cambridge University Press, 2003.
  4. IEEE Standard 1076-2008 VHDL-200X.
  5. Hamblen J., Hall T., Furman M.: Rapid Prototyping of Digital Systems. Springer, 2008.
Supplementary references
  1. Terasic Inc.: DE2-115 User Manual. www.terasic.com, 2010.
  2. My First FPGA for Altera DE2-115 Board. www.terasic.com, 2010.
  3. My First Nios II for Altera DE2-115 Board. www.terasic.com, 2010.
  4. Pedroni V. A.: Circuit Design with VHDL. MIT Press, 2004.
  5. Hwang E.: ELECTRONiX: Digital Logic and Microprocessor Design with VHDL. La Sierra University, 2005.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMarian Gilewski, Ph.D.31.01.2020

Application of Computer Science in Electrical Engineering

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameApplication of Computer Science in Electrical EngineeringCourse codeIS-FEE-10039W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
00003000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirementsElectrical circuits 1 and 2
Course objectivesTo receive the abilities to use the specific software for the analysis of electrical circuits. To verify the correctness of the reciving results that have to be properly interpreted. Student discuss problems by using good terminology and on the base on elaborated reports.
Course contentIntroduction to the PSpice/Micro Cup software. DC, AC and frequency analysis of branched circuits. Numerical analysis of transient states. Interpretation of results. Monte Carlo method and parametric analysis. Non-linear circuits. Analysis and processing of measuring data by means of spreadsheet.
Teaching methodsproblem-based learning, reports, consultations, self-work
Assessment methodPartial evaluations after a few sessons based on problem solving. The evaluations are providing to verify the ability of solving the problems concerning all indicated topics.
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1is able to use the software dedicated for electrical circuits analysis
LO2can estimate the correctness of numerical analysis results the electrical features and parameters of basic elements of electric circuits
LO3analises the DC and AC circuit with the use of PC software
LO4applies numerical methods for the analysis of electrical circuits
LO5elaborates the reports containing practical conclusions
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessment on the base of partial evaluations
LO2evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessment on the base of partial evaluations
LO3evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessment on the base of partial evaluations
LO4evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessment on the base of partial evaluations
LO5evaluating the quality of student’s report
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationattending the class sessions30
self-working on learning and preparing the problems solutions30
preparation for and participation in evaluations15
elaboration of reports25
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes and lecture5
TOTAL:105
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation351.5
Student workload – practical activities1054.0
Basic references
  1. Thomas R. E., Rosa A. J., Toussaint G. J.: The Analysis & Design of Linear Circuits. 6th ed, Wiley Inc., 2009.
  2. http://opu.ua/upload/files/summerschool/Pages_from_circuitsbook1.pdf
  3. Alexander Ch. K., Sadiku M. N. O.: Fundamentals of Electric Circuits. http://web.uettaxila.edu.pk/CMS/AUT2014/eeLCAbs/notes/Fundamentals%20of%20Electric%20Circuits%204th%20ed%20Alexander.pdf
Supplementary references
  1. https://sites.google.com/a/dimokijul.site/ralfniko/pspice-manual-for-electric-circuits-fundamentals
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeJaroslaw Makal, Ph.D. Eng.21.01.2020

Digital Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameDigital SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10040W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
1503001500No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTeaching a variety of problems related to contemporary digital systems based on micro-controllers and FPGA devices. Student will explain principles of operation of a variety of digital subsystems related to industrial digital systems and design simple digital subsystems.
Course contentLecture: Topics address electrical principles, semiconductor and integrated circuits, digital fundamentals, microcomputer systems based on microcontrollers and FPGA devices, serial interfaces for local communication. Laboratory classes: Practical exercises in programming and designing digital systems based on microcontrollers and FPGA and softcore processors.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory classes, individual consultations, mini projects
Assessment methodlecture – set of reports; laboratory classes– set of exercises and reports, SW – project evaluation
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1recognizes and understands wiring diagrams related to digital systems
LO2identifies various data buses and interfaces from the wiring diagrams
LO3determines function and operation of the various modules and sensors and has a good knowledge of how they are used in the management of the digital system
LO4distinguishes between various functions that are part of an industrial digital system
LO5uses suitable programming tools
LO6uses application notes and data sheets
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written report on lecture contentL
LO2written report on lecture contentL
LO3written report on lecture contentL
LO4written report on lecture contentL
LO5evaluating the student’s laboratory reportsLC, SW
LO6evaluating the student’s laboratory reportsLC, SW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc.30
preparation for a written test related to the lecture25
preparation for a written test related to the classes, laboratory classes etc.15
reports preparation related to the lecture, laboratory classes, project etc.30
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the lecture, classes, laboratory classes, project etc.10
TOTAL:125
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation552.0
Student workload – practical activities853.0
Basic references
  1. Tocci R. J.: Digital Systems: Principles and Applications. 2014.
  2. Dally W. J.: Digital Design: A Systems Approach. 2012.
  3. Williams E.: AVR Programming: Learning to Write Software for Hardware. 2014.
  4. Donzellini G., Oneto L., Ponta D., Anguita D.: Introduction to Digital Systems Design. Springer, 2019.
  5. Yiu J.: The Definitive Guide to ARM® Cortex®-M3 and Cortex®-M4 Processors. 2014.
Supplementary references
  1. Barrett S.: Embedded Systems Design with the Atmel AVR Microcontroller. Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2009.
  2. Barrett S.: Atmel AVR Microcontroller Primer: Programming and Interfacing. Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2007.
  3. Kurniawan A.: Getting Started With STM32 Nucleo Development. 2015.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeWojciech Wojtkowski, Ph.D.2021-03-02

Project of Electrical Installations in Industrial Building

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameProject of Electrical Installations in Industrial BuildingCourse codeIS-FEE-10044W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
00030000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTeaching how to solve an engineering project task by means of the information obtained from literature, databases and other sources.
Course contentComplete with module content: Rules and statutory regulations, Installed power loads – Characteristics, LV architecture selection guide, Lighting installations, Sizing and protection of conductors, Protection against electric shocks, LV switchgear: functions & selection, Overvoltage protection, Reactive energy.
Teaching methodsdiscussion, presentation
Assessment methodprojects completion, presentation and discussion of the projects
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1can elaborate and realize the schedule of actions necessary to achieve the goal
LO2identyfies and describes basic technical solutions in the area of the project
LO3can calculate basic quantities describing operating simple systems connected with the area of the project
LO4is able to obtain information from the literature, databases, and other sources for the project
LO5can design circuits and systems in chosen field of electrical engineering
LO6is able to use the data sheets and application notes to
LO7is able to prepare and present a short presentation on of the completed project
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1project documentation and oral performance in project’s classes
LO2project documentation
LO3project documentation
LO4project documentation
LO5project documentation
LO6project documentation
LO7oral performance in project’s classes
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationwork on the project130
consultations30
preparation to the defence of the project20
TOTAL:180
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities1806.0
Basic references
  1. Seip G. G.: Electrical Installations Handbook. John Wiley & Sons, Third Edition, 2000.
  2. Atkinson B.: Electrical installation design. John Wiley & Sons, Fourth Edition, 2013.
  3. Standards IEC 60364: Low voltage installations.
  4. Electrical installation guide. According to IEC international standards. Schneider Electric. Edition 2016.
Supplementary references
  1. Electrical installation handbook. Protection, control and electrical devices. Technical guide. 6-th edition 2010. ABB Sace.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMarcin A. Sulkowski Ph.D., Eng.13.01.2020

Electromagnetism – Engineering Physics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectromagnetism – Engineering PhysicsCourse codeIS-FEE-10046W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150001500No. of ECTS credits2
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo acquaint students with chosen electromagnetic phenomena. To show students mathematical formulation of the electromagnetic field theory, inc. vector calculus.
Course contentLecture: Principles of vector calculus: vector algebra, vector analysis. Assumptions of electromagnetic field (EM) theory, Electrostatics (Coulomb’s law, electrostatic field). Magnetostatics (Ampère’s law, magnetostatic field). Currents and conductors: current distributions, continuity of current, static electroconductive field, power losses. Electromagnetic potentials. Interface conditions. Maxwell’s macroscopic equations, the energy theorem. Electrodynamics (equation of continuity for electric chargé, displacement current, electromotive force, Faraday’s law of induction). Electromagnetic field: equations, power and the Poynting vector, conditions of continuity, interactions between the EM waves and materials. Electric polarisation and displacement, electric multipole moments, magnetisation, energy. Specialization workshop: Solving selected issues related to electrostatic, magnetostatics and current flow problems. The examples are solved using some computer applications and numerical methods.
Teaching methodsunderstands and knows the mathematical formulation of the EM field theory
Assessment methodlecture – final written test (at least 50% of points are necessary to pass); workshop – written reports and tests
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1understands and knows the mathematical formulation of the EM field theory
LO2is able to explain some field phenomena
LO3understands the principles of EM field, including some practical aspects (e.g. positive and spurious effects)
LO4explain some principles of EM field
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1test, evaluation of students’ reports and written testsL, SW
LO2test, evaluation of students’ reports and written testsL, SW
LO3test, evaluation of students’ reports and written testsL, SW
LO4test, evaluation of students’ reports and written testsL, SW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
preparation for workshops10
participation in workshops15
work on reports from workshop classes and/or work on home assignments7
participation in student-teacher sessions related to lectures and workshops3
preparation for and attendance at the final test from lectures10
TOTAL:60
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities321.5
Basic references
  1. Lehner G.: Electromagnetic field theory for engineers and physicists. Springer, New York 2010.
  2. Brandao Faria J. A.: Electromagnetic foundations of electrical engineering. J. Wiley & Sons, Chichester 2008.
  3. Griffiths D.: Introduction to Electrodynamics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2017.
  4. Orfanidis S. J.: Electromagnetic waves and antennas. Rudgers University, online version.
Supplementary references
  1. Morgenthaler F. R.: The power and beauty of electromagnetic fields. J. Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2011.
  2. Stratton J. A.: Electromagnetic theory. J. Wiley & Sons, New York 2007.
  3. Bhag G. S., Hiziroglu H. R.: Electromagnetic field theory fundamentals.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeBoguslaw Butrylo, D.Sc., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof.2020-12-13

Introduction to Programming in C

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameIntroduction to Programming in CCourse codeIS-FEE-10048W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
00003000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesDeveloping the skills of computer algorithms designing and implementing them in the form of programs in C language.
Course contentStructured programming in C language: data types, variables and constants, expressions and statements, operators, precedence of operators, formatted input/output, conditional statements, loops, arrays, pointers and dynamic memory allocation, structures, unions and bit fields, text and binary files, functions, passing argument to functions.
Teaching methodsmultimedia presentation, solving programming problems
Assessment methodtwo practical tests, evaluation of computer programs
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1writes and runs simple structured programs in C language using the appropriate data types and conditional statements×
LO2uses loops and arrays in programs in C language×
LO3defines and uses its own functions in programs in C language×
LO4reads and writes data from and to files in programs written in C language×
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1practical test, evaluation of computer programsSW
LO2practical test, evaluation of computer programsSW
LO3practical test, evaluation of computer programsSW
LO4practical test, evaluation of computer programsSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in specialization workshop30
preparation for specialization workshop18
working on homework (computer programs)18
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the specialization workshop5
preparation for practical tests (specialization workshop)10
TOTAL:81
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation351.5
Student workload – practical activities813.0
Basic references
  1. Prata S.: C Primer Plus (6th Edition) (Developer’s Library). Addison-Wesley Professional, 2013.
  2. Kernighan B. W., Ritchie D. M.: The C Programming Language. 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1988.
  3. Kochan S. G.: Programming in C (4th Edition) (Developer’s Library). Addison-Wesley Professional, 2014.
Supplementary references
  1. King K. N.: C Programming: A Modern Approach. 2nd Edition. W. W. Norton & Company, 2008.
  2. Reese R. M.: Understanding and Using C Pointers. O’Reilly Media, 2013.
  3. Shaw Z. A.: Learn C the Hard Way: Practical Exercises on the Computational Subjects You Keep Avoiding (Like C). Addison-Wesley Professional, 2015.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeJarosław Forenc, Ph.D.23.02.2020

Coding and Transmission of Signals

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameCoding and Transmission of SignalsCourse codeIS-FEE-10049W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150150000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirementsCircuits and Signals, Basics of Telecommunication
Course objectivesTo familiarize students with the methods of the source and channel encoding of signals, principles of passband and baseband digital transmission, types of modulation and the influence of the parameters of the signal and disturbances on the quality of the transmission. Practical verification of the knowledge.
Course contentMathematical description of the noise in the transmission medium. The basic concepts of the theory of detection and evaluation of the telecommunications signals. Characteristics of the baseband signals and encoding methods. Digital modulation methods: BPSK, QPSK, AM/PSK, MSK. Multiple methods of access: SDMA, TDMA, CDMA. Principles of channel coding: the concept of code distance block, cyclic and convolution codes.
Teaching methodslecture, presentation, projects, practical work in laboratory
Assessment methodlecture – written exam; laboratory classes – evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes methods of modulation, coding and transmission of the signals in presence of the disturbances
LO2performs measurements of telecommunication signals parameters
LO3analyzes the effect of the coding and the modulation of the signal on the quality of the transmission
LO4prepares the raport on the performed measurements
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written testL, LC
LO2assesment during laboratory classesLC
LO3written test, assesment during laboratory classesL, LC
LO4evaluation of the reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in laboratory classes15
preparation for laboratory classes10
working on reports10
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes4
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the laboratory classes6
preparation for and participation in exam20
TOTAL:80
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation401.5
Student workload – practical activities451.5
Basic references
  1. Haykin S.: Digital Communication Systems. John Wiley & Sons, 2014.
  2. Haykin S.: Communication Systems. 4th Ed. John Wiley & Sons, 2001.
  3. Proakis J. G., Salehi M.: Communication systems engineering. Prentice-Hall, 2002.
Supplementary references
  1. Brubank J. L., Andrusenko J., Everett J. S., Katsch W. T. M.: Wireless Networking. Understanding Internetworking Challenges. IEEE Press, 2013.
  2. Cox C.: An Introduction to LTE. LTE, LTE Advanced, SAE, VoLTE, and 4G Mobile Communications. 2nd Ed. Wiley, 2014.
  3. Ahmadi S.: LTE Advanced. A Practical Systems Approach to Understandingthe 3GPP LTE Releases 10 And 11 Radio Access Technologies. Elsevier, 2014.
  4. Glistic S., Lorenzo B.: Advanced Wireless Networks. Cognitive, Cooperative and Opportunistic 4G Technology. Wiley, 2014.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAdam Nikołajew, Ph. D.15.01.2020

Automatics in Telecommunication

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameAutomatics in TelecommunicationCourse codeIS-FEE-10050W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150001500No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirementsCircuits and signals, Basics of telecommunication
Course objectivesTo familiarize students with the basic principles of system operation control, tracking and synchronization in telecommunications systems and methods of their implementation.
Course contentThe mathematical methods of the description of the automation systems. The structure of the systems, transfer function, the conditions of stability and accuracy. Correlational analysis of automation systems in the presence of the noise . Discrete systems. Non-linear systems. Kalman Filters. Synchronization in digital telecommunications systems, phase locked loop, the Costas loop. Synchronization in telecommunication networks.
Teaching methodslecture – interactive lecture, specialization workshop – simulation of the systems
Assessment methodlecture – written exam; specialization workshop – evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the linear and non-linear control systems used in telecommunications and analyzes their operation
LO2describes the operation of sychronization systems in telecommunication networks
LO3schedules and simulates the operation of simple Automation devices in the presence of disturbances, analyzes the results and make conclusions
LO4prepares the raport on the performed simulations
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written testL
LO2assesment during laboratory classesL
LO3written test, assesment during laboratory classesSW
LO4evaluation of the reportsSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in specialization workshop15
preparation for specialization workshop10
working on reports10
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes4
participation in student-teacher sessions related to specialization workshop6
preparation for and participation in exam20
TOTAL:80
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation401.5
Student workload – practical activities411.5
Basic references
  1. Haykin S.: Digital Communication Systems. John Wiley & Sons, 2014.
  2. Haykin S.: Communication Systems. 4th Ed. John Wiley & Sons, 2001.
  3. Proakis J. G., Salehi M.: Communication systems engineering. Prentice-Hall, 2002.
Supplementary references
  1. Haykin S.: Adaptive Filter Theory. 3rd ed., Prentice Hall, 2009.
  2. Gustafson F.: Adaptive Filtering and Change Detection. Wiley & Sons, 2000.
  3. Sarkaa S.: Bayesian Filtering and Smoothing. Cambridge University Press, 2013.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAdam Nikolajew, Ph. D.15.01.2020

Optoelectronics – Sources and Detectors of Optical Radiation

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameOptoelectronics – Sources and Detectors of Optical RadiationCourse codeIS-FEE-10052W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150300000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo acquaint students with the main theme of sources and detectors of optical radiation. Identification of areas of sources and detectors of optical radiation applications including respectively: industry, medicine, telecommunication, military technology, visual effects. To Acquaint students with the current state of development and research in the field of modern sources and detectors of optical radiation. To acquaint students with the classification and properties of sources and detectors of optical radiation. To overview selected problems: optical phenomena in semiconductors, the analysis of structures of semiconductor detectors and emitters. To familiarize students with the parameters of sources and detectors of optical radiation used in telecommunications and optoelectronics. To teach the principles of operation and measurement of the sources and detectors of optical radiation: electro-optical, spectral characteristics of LEDs and lasers, static, control and frequency characteristics of photonic and thermal radiation detectors. To teach the ability to use semiconductor sources and radiation detectors. To teach the skills of selecting sources and detectors' parameters for selected applications.
Course contentMethods of producing optical radiation. Classical light sources and their applications in optoelectronics (radiation patterns). The phenomenon of radiation in semiconductors. Methods of analysis of semiconductor structures. Structure, principle of operation, operating systems of emitters and detectors of optical radiation. LEDs, semiconductor lasers, photoluminescence, emission of radiation in organic materials. Electro-optical and spectral parameters of thermal and semiconductor sources. Photon and thermal radiation detectors. Electro-optical, spectral, frequency parameters of optical radiation detectors. Construction and operation of the detector arrays (CCD, CMOS, thermal) in visible or infrared light. The use of sources and detectors of radiation. Selected applications and measurement teqchniques.
Teaching methodsclassic lecture with elements of inverted lecture, demonstration of basics phenomena, problem solving and problem-based learning, laboratory experiments, practical work and reports
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, laboratory classes – evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has detailed knowledge of sources and detectors of optical radiation
LO2explains optical phenomena occurring in semiconductors
LO3discusses and characterizes the construction of sources and detectors of optical radiation
LO4measures and analyzes the properties of semiconductor radiation emitters
LO5measures and analyzes the properties of optical radiation detectors
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written examL
LO2written examL
LO3written examL
LO4evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classesLC
LO5evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classesLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in the laboratory30
preparation for the laboratory20
working and description of laboratory reports20
participation in lecture / student – teacher consultations5
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the laboratory classes5
preparing to pass the exam20
TOTAL:115
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation552.0
Student workload – practical activities753.0
Basic references
  1. Deen J. A., Basu P. K.: Silicon photonics: fundamentals and devices. Wiley & Sons, Chichester 2012.
  2. Kasap F.: Optoelectronics and photonics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2012.
  3. Hu Wenping: Organic optoelectronics. Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2013.
Supplementary references
  1. Kingston R. H.: Detection of optical and infrared radiation (Vol. 10). Springer, 2013.
  2. Keyes R. J.: Optical and infrared detectors (Vol. 19). Springer Science & Business Media, 2013.
  3. Rogalski, A.: Infrared detectors. CRC Press, 2010.
  4. Schubert E. F., Gessmann T., Kim J. K.: Light emitting diodes. Wiley & Sons, 2005.
  5. Agrawal G. P., Dutta N. K.: Semiconductor lasers. Springer Science & Business Media, 2013.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeUrszula Błaszczak Ph.D. Eng., Łukasz Gryko Ph.D. Eng.30.01.2020

Object-Oriented Programming

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameObject-Oriented ProgrammingCourse codeIS-FEE-10053W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
00003000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesFamiliarising students with the methods and structures used in object-oriented programming in C language. Implementation of a project consisting in self-writing the program in C with the practical application of methods of object-oriented programming.
Course contentPointers and functions. Overloading. An object and a class. Creation and destruction of the object. Objects and pointers. Properties and methods. Overloading of methods and operators. Encapsulation. Inheritance. Polymorphism and virtual methods. Standard Template Library.
Teaching methodspractical work and reports
Assessment methodverification of preparation for classes, evaluation of written programs
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1defines and uses in practice concepts in object-oriented programming
LO2designs, starts and tests the program in C++ written in accordance with the principles of object-oriented programming
LO3analyzes and corrects errors in the program
LO4uses libraries of classes and templates during practical writing of the program
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1assessment during the classes, evaluation of the projects
LO2assessment during the classes, evaluation of the projects
LO3assessment during the classes, evaluation of the projects
LO4assessment during the classes, evaluation of the projects
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in the laboratory30
preparation for the laboratory20
working and description of laboratory reports20
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the laboratory classes5
analysis and improvement of programs30
TOTAL:105
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation351.5
Student workload – practical activities1054.0
Basic references
  1. Stroustrup B.: The C++ Programming Language. 4th ed., Addison-Wesley 2013.
  2. Savitch W.: Absolute C++. 5th ed., Pearson, 2013.
  3. Stroustrup B.: A Tour of C++. Addison-Wesley, 2014.
  4. Gregoire M.: Professional C++. 3rd ed., Wrox-Wiley, 2016.
  5. Johnson B.: Professional Visual Studio 2015. Wrox, 2015.
Supplementary references
  1. Liberty J., Rao S., Jones B.: Teach Yourself C++ in One Hour a Day. 8th ed., SAMS, 2017.
  2. Schildt H.: C++ The Complete Reference. 4th ed., McGraw-Hill, 2000.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAdam Nikołajew, Ph.D.27.01.2020

Process Automation

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameProcess AutomationCourse codeIS-FEE-10054W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300030000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis course deals with the study of engineering principles and methodologies used to design and analysis of event driven (discrete) and continuous systems. Emphasis is placed on description methods and software implementation of combination and sequential systems. A structured approach to automation of selected systems, identifies appropriate equipment, production and manufacturing techniques.
Course contentAutomation of event driven systems (discrete) and continuous systems. Finite state machines theory. Melay and Moore machines. Description methods of combination, synchronous and asynchronous sequential systems and their elements. Types and conversion, codes. Diagram; state reduction; state assignment. Grafcet, SFC, Grafpol and Ladder diagram design sequence. PLC-based operative unit programming. Sequential logic implementation. Analysis by signal tracing and timing diagrams. Matlab Stateflow functions. Derivation of state tables and diagrams. True tables. Steps, transitions, connectors, direct links, logical conditions.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, Matlab/Simulink software, Matlab/Simulink, Stateflow toolbox, project examples, MathWorks help, text books
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, project – project completion, presentation and discussion, performance of the project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1basic knowledge of sequential and combinational circuits, programming methods, and designing of industrial automation process
LO2knowledge of even driven (digital) and continuous control systems hardware, principle of finite state machines, and background of automation systems
LO3knowledge of define of automation systems, ability to search, integrate and interpret information from literature and alternative sources
LO4practical skills to design of continuous and discrete control systems including their functionality and economic benefit, control systems' hardware selection ability and the self-tuning of controllers' parameters
LO5ability and skills to event driven control system design, and to formulate assumptions/conditions for the basic automation batch process
LO6demand for permanent education as well as an increased awareness of its vital importance for development
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written examL
LO2written examL
LO3written examL
LO4written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO5written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO6written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc.30
preparation for classes, laboratory classes, projects, seminars25
working on projects, reports, etc.45
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project5
implementation of project tasks and preparation for and participation in exams/tests22
TOTAL:157
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation682.5
Student workload – practical activities1164.0
Basic references
  1. Roth C. H.: Fundamentals Logic Design. Jaico Publishing, IV edition, 2002.
  2. Floyd T. L.: Digital Fundamentals. 10th edition, Pearson Education, 2009.
  3. Hugh J.: Automating Manufacturing Systems with PLCs. E-book, Ver. 5.0, 2007.
  4. Mano M. M., Ciletti M. D.: Digital Design. Pearson Education, 5th edition 2012.
  5. The MathWorks: Stateflow Toolbox for Matlab.
Supplementary references
  1. Bequette B. W.: Process Control, Modeling, Design and Simulation. Prentice Hall, 2003.
  2. Dorf R. C., Bishop R. H.: Modern Control Systems. 10th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2005.
  3. www.mathworks.com
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAssoc. Prof. Arkadiusz Mystkowski PhD, DSc, Eng25.03.2020

Industrial Networks

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameIndustrial NetworksCourse codeIS-FEE-10055W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300030000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis course deals with study of engineering principles and methodologies used to design, configure and programing of the industrial network: PROFIBUS DP. Emphasis is placed on hardware and software engineering due to PLC controller’s networks based on the SIMATIC. This course fulfils the general maintenance of industry process-data exchanging between PLCs in the real-time control systems. A practice knowledge to network configuration and run-operations for peripheral devices and network diagnostics is also introduced.
Course contentBasic of industrial network PROFIBUS DP. Physical layer, cabling, parameters. Types of data transmission, communication’s protocols and bus data access methods. Fundamentals principles of PROFIBUS DP communication. Isochronous real-time (IRT) mode, layers and addressing of active and passive components. Programming of synchronous and asynchronous data exchange in PROFIBUS DP based on the SIMATIC. Diagnostic of PROFIBUS DP: diagnostic functions, errors detects and faults localization, monitoring, alarms and software blocks of PLC to data errors recording.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, PLC programming software, PLC simulators, text books and other technical data
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, project – project completion, presentation and discussion, performance of the project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1basic knowledge of principle of PROFIBUS DP network and communication protocols
LO2ability to programming of data exchange in the real-time industrial control systems and knowledge of distributed peripheral control devices
LO3basic knowledge of performing diagnostic software methods and topology design of PROFIBUS DP network and hardware components
LO4practical skills to design, configure, parameters set-up, start-run and service of the industrial network: PROFIBUS DP
LO5practical skills to programming of communication functions for PROFIBUS DP
LO6practical skills to programming diagnostic software methods, demand for cooperation with other student within group, as well as an increased awareness of its vital importance for development
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO2written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO3written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO4project evaluation, activity on project classesP
LO5project evaluation, activity on project classesP
LO6project evaluation, activity on project classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc.30
preparation for classes, laboratory classes, projects, seminars, etc.27
working on projects, reports, etc.12
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project4
implementation of project tasks, preparation for and participation in exams/tests32
TOTAL:135
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation642.5
Student workload – practical activities803.0
Basic references
  1. Popp M.: The New Rapid Way to PROFIBUS DP. PROFIBUS Nutzerorganisation e.V., 2004.
  2. Mahalik N. P.: Fieldbus Technology: Industrial Networks Standards for Real-Time Distributed Control. Springer, 2003.
  3. EN 50170-2 PROFIBUS, EN 50254-3 PROFIBUS-DP, ICS 61158 and 61784 PROFINET.
Supplementary references
  1. Hugh J., Automating Manufacturing Systems with PLCs. E-book, Ver. 5.0, 2007.
  2. Mackay S., Wright E., Reynders D., Park J.: Practical Industrial Data Networks: Design, Installation and Troubleshooting (IDC Technology). Elsevier Linacre House, 1st edition, 2004.
  3. Industrial Communication Catalog IK PI, SIEMENS, 2002/2003.
  4. www.profibus.com
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeArkadiusz Mystkowski PhD, D.Sc., Eng., Assoc Prof.25.03.2020

Computer Methods in Automatics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameComputer Methods in AutomaticsCourse codeIS-FEE-10056W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300030000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis course deals with the study of engineering principles and methodologies used main computer programs to solve fundamental problems in control plants and control systems. Major course topics include knowledge of Matlab/Simulink software used to computing, modelling, analysing and plotting of dynamical systems and linear control systems. Before attendance of this course, students should have basic knowledge of computer programming and description of control plants.
Course contentDescriptions of the main computer programs used in automatics. Introduction and fundamentals of Matlab. System functions and configuration of Matlab environment. Matrix and operations. Numerical computations. M-files and function scripts. Graphics, plotting and visualization in 2D and 3D. Modelling of dynamical systems with Control Toolbox. Design of complex dynamical systems by using Control Toolbox. Analysing dynamical systems in time and frequency domains in Matlab. Design linear control systems in Matlab. Introduction and fundamentals of Simulink. Setup and simulation parameters in Simulink. Modelling and simulations of dynamical systems in Simulink. Design and analysing of the complex control systems in Simulink. Group subsystems and map blocks in Simulink. Modelling and investigations of dynamical systems in Matlab Control Toolbox. Design and simulations of dynamical systems in Simulink. Design of linear control system with structurally unstable control plant in Matlab/Simulink. PID and LQR control design.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, Matlab/Simulink software, Matlab/Simulink Toolboxes, project examples, MathWorks help, text books, other documents given by the teacher
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, project – project completion, presentation and discussion, performance of the project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knowledge and solving of differential equations with using Matlab/Simulink
LO2modelling and solving of linear dynamic systems with Matlab/Simulink
LO3knowledge of methods of designing control plants in the Matlab/Simulink program
LO4practical skills needed to develop and calculate the modelling and control design problems with support of
LO5skills and knowledge acquired to a practical, hands-on project, linear control design methods with Matlab/Simulink
LO6demand for cooperation with other student within group, as well as an increased awareness of its vital importance for development
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO2written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO3written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO4written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO5written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO6activity on project classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc.30
preparation for classes, laboratory classes, projects, seminars, etc.42
working on projects, reports, etc.12
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project4
implementation of project tasks and preparation for and participation in exams/tests48
TOTAL:166
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation662.5
Student workload – practical activities1104.0
Basic references
  1. Tewari A.: Modern Control Design: with Matlab and Simulink. Wiley-IEEE Press, 2001.
  2. Ogata K.: Modern Control Engineering. 4th ed., Pearson Education International, 2002.
  3. Hahn B., Valentine D. T.: Essential Matlab for Engineers and Scientists. 3rd ed., Elsevier Science & Technology Books, 2007.
Supplementary references
  1. Bequette B. W.: Process Control, Modeling, Design and Simulation. Prentice Hall, 2003.
  2. Dorf R. C., Bishop R. H.: Modern Control Systems. 10th ed., Prentice Hall, 2005.
  3. The MathWorks: Control System ToolboxTM User’s Guide. 8th ed., 2009.
  4. www.mathworks.com.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAssoc Prof. Arkadiusz Mystkowski, PhD, DSc, Eng25.03.2020

Modern Control of Mechatronics Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameModern Control of Mechatronics SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10057W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150015000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis course deals with the study of control theory including advanced robust optimal methods, such as H-infinity, mu-Synthesis, LMI, mixed-sensitivity, loop-shaping, uncertain systems, nonlinear observers, feedback linearization, control Lyapunov functions. Moreover, these designs with its applications to the mechatronics systems, including electro-drives, electrical circuits, electro-mechanical, electro-pneumatics, and hydraulics. Major course topics include knowledge of linear/nonlinear and applications engineering principles and methodologies used to solve advanced problems in control systems.
Course contentPrinciple subject outcomes include sensitivity and complementary sensitivity functions, H-2 and H-inf spaces. Dynamic systems with linear-parameter-varying. Design of structured and unstructured uncertainty. Robustness, small-gain theorem. Linear fractional transformation. Optimal control with H-2 or H-infinity. Mu-synthesis control. System order minimization. Stability of the nonlinear control systems according to control Lyapunov functions.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, Matlab/Simulink software, Matlab/Simulink Toolboxes, project examples, MathWorks help, text books, other documents given by the teacher
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, project – project completion, presentation and discussion, performance of the project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1basic knowledge of robust control design and application including optimal control, LFT models, and LPV systems
LO2basic knowledge of system order reduction and minimization methods, calculating of the system’s norms
LO3practical skills of stability calculating and control performance index for closed-loop dynamic systems
LO4practical skills needed to develop and calculate the modelling of the uncertain systems and robustness
LO5skills and knowledge acquired to numerical calculations and simulation of linear/nonlinear control system using Matlab/Simulink
LO6demand for cooperation with other student within group, as well as an increased awareness of its vital importance for developmentSM_K01
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO2written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO3written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO4written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO5written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO6activity on project classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in classes15
preparation for projects30
working on projects, reports, etc40
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the project2
preparation to the exam23
TOTAL:125
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation381.5
Student workload – practical activities853.0
Basic references
  1. Isidori A.: Nonlinear control systems. Springer, 1996.
  2. Marino R., Tomei P.: Nonlinear control design. Prentice Hall, 1995.
  3. Zhou K., Doyle J. C.: Essentials of robust control. Prentice Hall, 1998.
  4. Freeman R. A., Kokotović P. V.: Robust nonlinear control design, state-space and Lyapunov techniques. Birkhäuser, 2008.
  5. Ogata K.: Modern Control Engineering. 4th ed., Pearson Education International, 2002.
Supplementary references
  1. Dorf R. C., Bishop R. H.: Modern Control Systems. 10th ed., Prentice Hall, 2005.
  2. Tewari A.: Modern Control Design: With Matlab and Simulink. Wiley-IEEE Press, 2001.
  3. Bequette B. W.: Process Control, Modeling, Design and Simulation. Prentice Hall, 2003.
  4. Potvin A. F.: Nonlinear Control Design Toolbox. The MathWorks, Inc., Natick 1994.
  5. The MathWorks: Control System ToolboxTM User’s Guide. 8th ed., 2009.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAssoc. Prof. Arkadiusz Mystkowski, PhD, DSc, Eng25.03.2020

Computer-Based Measurement Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameComputer-Based Measurement SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10058W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150030000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirementsMathematics I, II, Signals Theory or equivalent
Course objectivesTo familiarize students with the methods and ways of measurements of physical quantities using the computer-based measurement system. Presentation of the methods of measurement signals processing, their acquisition and graphical representation.
Course contentLecture: Fundamental measurement signals and sensors used in automation. Characteristics of measurement signals. Filtration methods and analysis of measurement errors. The rules of a program implementation in the LabView environment. The basic blocks of the LabView package. Control of measuring devices by a computer. Acquisition of measurement data. Analysis and presentation of data. Graphical user interface. Project: Measurement, acquisition and representation of real digital and analogue signals. Selection of measurement methodology and of construction of filters applied to measurement signals. Creating dedicated applications for acquisition, processing and representation of measurement signals.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, LabView software, instructions
Assessment methodlecture – written test; project – project implementation, presentation and
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1lists, classifies and characterizes measurement signals and elements of a computer measuring system
LO2selects a proper method for measurement of elementary physical parameters
LO3presents properly measurement results
LO4is able to implement designed algorithms for acquisition and processing of measurement signals
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1L: written testL
LO2L: written test, P: project evaluation, activity on classesL, P
LO3L: written test, P: project evaluation, activity on classesL, P
LO4p: project evaluation, activity on classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in lectures15
participation in project classes30
preparation for exams/tests10
working on projects, reports, etc.25
participation in consultations3
TOTAL:83
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation481.5
Student workload – practical activities552.0
Basic references
  1. Training materials of National Instruments (online).
  2. Ponce-Cruz P., Ramírez-Figueroa F. D.: Intelligent control systems with LabVIEW. Springer-Verlag, London 2010.
  3. Clark C. L: LabView digital signal processing and digital communication. McGraw-Hill, New York 2005.
  4. Walczak J., Grabowski D., Maciążek M.: Introduction to digital signal processing. Wydaw. Politechniki Śląskiej, Gliwice 2013.
Supplementary references
  1. LabView Core 1 and 2, course manual and exercises. National Instruments Corporation, 2009.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMichał Ostaszewski, PhD17.02.2020

Visualization of Industrial Processes

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameVisualization of Industrial ProcessesCourse codeIS-FEE-10059W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150030000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesIntroduction to the visualization systems used in industrial applications on the example of SCADA – Wonderware InTouch software.
Course contentLecture: Introduction to Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition systems: evolution, classification, types, characteristics. SCADA-HMI systems architecture: functions, capabilities (data processing, data recording, alarming, security). Communication in SCADA-HMI systems: DDE protocol, OPC protocol. Examples of SCADA-HMI systems. Project: Project in the InTouch environment: visualisation windows, tags and animation links, scripts and QuickScript, alarming, historic and real-time trends, communication with DDE protocol (external applications), communication with PLC controllers, project publication.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, Wonderware System Platform software, instructions
Assessment methodlecture – written test; project – project implementation, presentation and
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knows and understands architecture of SCADA-HMI systems
LO2knows and understands functions and tasks fulfilled by SCADA-HMI systems
LO3knows programming languages suitable for SCADA systems
LO4can design efficient visualisation system of given technological process
LO5can configure scripts and implementation them in visualization systems
LO6can create individual and team projects
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written testL
LO2written testL
LO3written testL
LO4project evaluation, activity on classesP
LO5project evaluation, activity on classesP
LO6project evaluation, activity on classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in lectures15
participation in project classes30
preparation for exams/tests15
working on projects, reports, etc.45
participation in consultations2
TOTAL:107
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation481.5
Student workload – practical activities773.0
Basic references
  1. Wonderware ArchestrA System Platform in a Virtualized Environment Implementation Guide, 2014.
  2. InTouch HMI Getting Started Guide, 2014.
  3. InTouch HMI Scripting and Logic Guide, 2008.
  4. Wonderware OPCLink, 2003.
  5. Guyer J. P.: An Introduction to Fundamentals of SCADA Systems. 2017.
Supplementary references
  1. Boyer S. A.: SCADA: Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition. 2004.
  2. Wright E.: Practical SCADA for Industry, 2003.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMichał Ostaszewski, PhD17.02.2020

Grid Integration of Renewable Energy

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameGrid Integration of Renewable EnergyCourse codeIS-FEE-10060W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
30000000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe students will be introduced to the concept of distributed generation; learn integration of renewable energy into the grid and its challenges and opportunities. This module will also discuss fundamentals of smart grid system, smart metering, real-time pricing, modelling, and control of renewable and green energy.
Course contentPower system structure and fundamentals of renewable energy sources (review), concept of distributed generation, need for the integration of renewable energy sources, issues related to grid integration-protection, mitigation of power quality issues, interconnection standards and grid codes. Principles of wind energy operation, characteristics of wind turbines, energy conversion and voltage regulation. Solar photovoltaic cells, energy conversion, electrical modelling, optimal power extraction, shading and grid connection. Modelling and control of renewable sources in distributed generation system, stand-alone operation and grid connected. Issues related to large wind farm and PV. Concept of smart grid technologies: concept, definitions and need for smart grid, concept of smart meters and advanced metering infrastructure and electric vehicles: plug in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV).
Teaching methodslectures with the support of media (video) and assignments
Assessment methodwritten exam towards the end of the semester
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1understands the importance of renewable energy in the global and national context
LO2identifies emerging issues and assess the impacts of renewable energy on the electricity system design
LO3describes the characteristics and basic operation of distributed energy resources
LO4understands the importance of standards and codes related to grid integration
LO5understands the working of wind energy and solar PV conversion systems and their integration to grid
LO6describes smart grid, advanced metering infrastructure and integration of electric vehicles
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam based on the lectureL
LO2exam based on the lectureL
LO3exam based on the lectureL
LO4exam based on the lectureL
LO5exam based on the lectureL
LO6exam based on the lectureL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationclass attendance30
assignments and self-study30
preparation and write exam15
TOTAL:75
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.5
Student workload – practical activities451.5
Basic references
  1. Keyhani A., Marwali M. N., Dai M.: Integration of Green and Renewable Energy in Electric Power Systems. Wiley & Sons, 2009.
  2. Farret F. A., Simoes M. G.: Integration of Alternative sources of Energy. Wiley-IEEE Press, 2006.
  3. Hossain J., Mahmud A.: Renewable energy integration: Challenges and Solutions. Springer-Verlag, Singapore 2014.
  4. Ekanayake J. B., Jenkins N., Liyanage K., Wu J., Yokoyama A.: Smart Grid: Technology and Applications. John Wiley & Sons, 2012.
  5. Jones E. L.: Renewable energy integration: practical management of variability, uncertainty and flexibility in power grids. Elsevier Academic Press, 2014.
  6. Twidell J., Weir T.: Renewable Energy Resources. 3-rd edition, Taylor & Francis, 2015.
Supplementary references
  1. Qing-Chang Zhong, Tomas Hornik: Control of Power Inverters in Renewable Energy and Smart Grid Integration. Wiley-IEEE Press, 2013.
  2. Fereidoon Sioshansi: Smart grid: integrating renewable, distributed, and efficient energy. Academic Press, 2011
  3. Clark W. Gellings: The Smart Grid: Enabling Energy Efficiency and Demand Response. CRC Press, Taylor & Francis, 2009.
  4. Gilbert M. Masters: Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems, 2nd edition, Wiley-IEEE Press, 2013.
  5. James Momoh: Smart Grid: Fundamentals of design and analysis. Wiley & Sons, IEEE Press 2012.
  6. Prabha Kundur: Power System Stability and Control. McGraw-Hill, 1994.
  7. Hadi Saadat: Power System Analysis. McGraw-Hill, 2010.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndu Dukpa, PhD2021-05-12

Power System Analysis

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course namePower System AnalysisCourse codeIS-FEE-10061W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
30000000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis module will introduce students to power system modelling and power flow analysis. The students will also be able to distinguish various types of power system faults and carry out short circuit and transient stability analysis.
Course contentPower system network representation, graph theory and formation of Z-Bus. Power flow analysis; various methods with numerical examples, introduction to load flow software. Short circuit analysis, review of per unit system, types of faults, analysis and symmetrical component theory and transformation. Power system steady state and transient analysis, equal area criterion, solution of swing equation, methods to improve stability.
Teaching methodslectures with the support of media (video) and assignments
Assessment methodwritten exam towards the end of the semester
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1discusses basic concept of power system network matrices
LO2interpretes the importance of power flow studies and apply different power flow methods and write simple power flow computer program
LO3defines per unit system and its application in power system
LO4performs symmetrical fault analysis and calculation of short circuit current and MVA
LO5identifies different types of faults in power system such as LL, LLG, LLLG etc. and frequency of their occurrence
LO6derives swing equation and its interpretations and compare various stability methods
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam based on the lectureL
LO2exam based on the lecture and assignmentsL
LO3exam based on the lectureL
LO4exam based on the lecture and assignmentsL
LO5exam based on the lecture and assignmentsL
LO6exam based on the lectureL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationclass attendance30
assignments and self-study30
preparation and write exam15
TOTAL:75
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.5
Student workload – practical activities451.5
Basic references
  1. Prabha Kundur: Power System Stability and Control. McGraw-Hill, 1994.
  2. D. P. Kothari, I. Nagrath: Modern Power System Analysis. McGraw-Hill, 2011.
  3. Hadi Saadat: Power System Analysis. McGraw-Hill, 2010.
  4. John J. Grainger, William D. Stevenson Jr.: Power System Analysis. McGraw-Hill, 1994.
Supplementary references
  1. Arthur R. Bergen, Vijay Vittal: Power System Analysis. Pearson, 2000.
  2. J. Duncan Glover, Mulukutla S. Sarma, Thomas Overbye: Power System Analysis and Design. Cengage Learning, 2012.
  3. Turan Gonen: Modern Power System Analysis. CRC Press, 2013.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndu Dukpa, PhD2021-05-12

Renewable Energy Technologies

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameRenewable Energy TechnologiesCourse codeIS-FEE-10062W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
30000000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis module will introduce students to various renewable energy resources and technologies used for harnessing them. Students will also be able to understand introductory concepts of economics surrounding renewable energy system.
Course contentPower system structure, systems for converting various forms of energy into electricity. Primary energy sources and processing systems. Hydro, Wind, Solar photovoltaic, Biomass and Geothermal Energy resources. Construction, operating principle, basic functional characteristics of these RES. Storage systems. Energy economics surrounding RES, costs and pricing scheme.
Teaching methodslectures with the support of media (video) and assignments
Assessment methodwritten exam towards the end of the semester
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1understands power system structure and the distinction between renewable and non-renewable energy sources
LO2understands global scenario involving energy demand and the need for renewable energy
LO3explains RES technologies: Hydro, Wind, Solar, Biomass and Geothermal
LO4compares various RES technologies and identify the most suitable technology based on local conditions
LO5discusses the importance of storage in RES and the latest storage technologies
LO6understands energy costs including LCOE, LCC etc and describe various pricing scheme surounding RES
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam based on the lectureL
LO2exam based on the lectureL
LO3exam based on the lectureL
LO4exam based on the lectureL
LO5exam based on the lectureL
LO6exam based on the lectureL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationclass attendance30
assignments and self-study30
preparation and write exam15
TOTAL:75
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.5
Student workload – practical activities451.5
Basic references
  1. John Twidell, Tony Weir: Renewable Energy Resources. 3rd edition. Taylor & Francis, 2015.
  2. Gilbert M. Masters: Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems. 2nd edition. Wiley-IEEE Press, 2013.
  3. Aldo da Rosa: Fundamentals of Renewable Energy Processes. Academic Press, 2005.
  4. Francis M. Vanek, Louis D. Albright, Largus T. Angenent: Energy Systems Engineering: Evaluation and Implementation. 3rd edition. McGraw-Hill, 2016.
Supplementary references
  1. Bent Sorensen: Renewable Energy: Physics, Engineering, Environmental Impacts, Economics and Planning. 5th Edition. Elsevier Academic Press, 2017.
  2. B. K. Hodge: Alternative Energy Systems & Applications. 2nd edition. Wiley, 2017.
  3. Godfrey Boyle: Renewable Energy: Power for a Sustainable Future. 3rd edition. Oxford University Press, 2012.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndu Dukpa, PhD2021-05-12

Digital Signal Processors

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameDigital Signal ProcessorsCourse codeIS-FEE-20001W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo acquaint students with the knowledge related to Digital Signal Processor (DSP) software development and the implementation of basic methods of digital signal processing. The above knowledge is extended by practical skills gained in the laboratory classes, during which the student performs implementation of the digital signal processing tasks on a selected DSP platform.
Course contentLecture: Digital Signal Processors characteristics and their use in electronics and telecommunications. Overview of currently produced DSPs. DSP computer architecture. Designing systems using DSPs. Overview of the selected DSP processor. Overview of the whole process starting from the design of a digital signal processing method to the implementation on a DSP platform. Software development using C and assembler, software development tools, IDE, API, software optimization, real time data exchange and analysis. Programming tips. The use of the processor peripherals and external devices. Real-time performance. Dedicated real-time operating system. DSP implementation of selected signal processing methods. Laboratory class: Digital Signal Processor software development. DSP implementation of selected signal processing methods. Student projects.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class, problem solving with implementation on DSP system
Assessment methodlecture – test; laboratory class – evaluation of student’s performance in classes and reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knows issues of DSPs architecture and peripheral devices, and knows principles of using DSPs to perform basic digital signal processing tasks
LO2is familiar with the issues of software development and knows the principles of DSP implementation of selected digital signal processing methods
LO3can develop software on a DSP system with the use of C and IDE, API and dedicated real-time operating system
LO4can formulate the algorithm realisation of digital signal processing method and is able to implement it on DSP system
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1testsL
LO2testsL
LO3evaluation of student’s performance in classes and reportsLC
LO4evaluation of student’s performance in classes and reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes and preparation for tests40
work on projects and reports45
participation in student-teacher sessions5
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation652.0
Student workload – practical activities1004.0
Basic references
  1. Kehtarnavaz N.: Real-Time Digital Signal Processing: Based on the TMS320C6000. Newnes, 2005.
  2. Welch T. B., Wright C. H. G., Morrow M. G.: Real-Time Digital Signal Processing from Matlab to C with the TMS320C6x DSPs. Taylor & Francis, 2012.
  3. Dahnoun N.: Multicore DSP: from Algorithms to Real-Time Implementation on the TMS320C66x SoC. John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2018.
  4. Texas Instruments: TMS320C6000 Programmer’s Guide. 2006.
  5. Texas Instruments: TMS320C6000 DSP Peripherals Overview. 2007.
Supplementary references
  1. Chassaing R.: Digital Signal Processing and Applications with the C6713 and C6416 DSK. John Wiley & Sons, New York 2005.
  2. Dahnoum N.: Digital Signal Processing Implementation Using the TMS320C6000 DSP platform. Prentice Hall, 2000.
  3. Kuo S. M., Lee B. H., Tian W.: Real-Time Digital Signal Processing. Implementations and Applications. John Wiley & Sons, New York 2006.
  4. Oshana R.: DSP Software Development Techniques for Embedded and Real-Time Systems: Embedded Technology. Newnes, 2006.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeDariusz Jańczak, PhD, DSc24.04.2020

Non-linear and Advanced Control of Electromechanical Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameNon-linear and Advanced Control of Electromechanical SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-20002W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300150000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe aim of the subject is to develop the theoretical and practical student’s knowledge on nonlinear control methods and adaptive techniques used in electromechanical systems. The acquiring experience by students in design of estimation systems of physical quantities and parameters of the electromechanical subsystem. Acquainting students with the methods for stability analysis of nonlinear electromechanical systems. The acquiring experience by students in the experimental investigations of the nonlinear and the adaptive electromechanical system.
Course contentOverview of nonlinearly and adaptively controlled electromechanical systems. Non-linear controllers for time-minimal and without overshoot control of the electromechanical subsystems with DC motors and Permanent Magnets Sychronous Motors. Off-line and on-line estimation techniques of the parameters and the physical quantities of the electrical machines. Vector control methods. Space vector modulation techniques of transistor converters. Dynamic programming method. The analysis of stability of the nonlinearly controlled systems. Digital control methods of electromechanical systems. Experimental exercises with electromechanical systems nonlinearly controlled by Digital Signal Processors.
Teaching methodslecture,laboratory classes
Assessment methodlecture – oral exam
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1analyses structure of a simple nonlinear, adaptive electromechanical system
LO2designes the adaptive estimator of the parameters and the physical quantity
LO3analyses stability of nonlinear system
LO4uses adaptive systems with digital signal processor
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam on lecture contentL
LO2evaluating the student’s reports and performance in classesLC
LO3evaluating the student’s reports and performance in classesLC
LO4evaluating the student’s reports and performance in classesLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in laboratory classes15
preparation for lecture, laboratory classes15
work on reports25
preparation for and participation in exam15
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation451.5
Student workload – practical activities702.5
Basic references
  1. Krause P., Wasynczuk O., Sudhoff S.: Analysis of Electric Machinery and Drive Systems, Wiley-Interscience, USA 2002.
  2. Boldea I., Nasar S. A.: Electric Drives., 2nd ed., Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton 2006.
  3. Wu B., Lang Y., Zargari N., Kouro S.: Power Conversion and control of wind energy systems. IEEE Press, John Wiley & Sons, Canada 2011.
  4. Veltman A., Pulle Duco W. J., Doncker R. W. D.: Fundamental of Electrical Drives. Springer, Netherlands 2007.
Supplementary references
  1. Seung-Ki S.: Control of Electric Machine Drive Systems. IEEE Press, John Wiley & Sons, USA 2011.
  2. Leonard W.: Control of Elektric Drives, 3rd ed., Springer, Berlin 2001.
  3. Sanath A.: Digital Control Techniques for Sensorless Electrical Drives. VDM Verlag Dr Muller, Germany 2009.
  4. Wilamowski B. M., Irwin J. D.: Control and Mechatronics. Taylor & Francis, USA 2011.
  5. Vukosavic S. N.: Digital Control of Electric Drives. Springer, 2007.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Andrzejewski, PhD Eng14.02.2020

Special Optical Fibers 2

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameSpecial Optical Fibers 2Course codeIS-FEE-20003W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
001501500No. of ECTS credits2
Entry requirementsBasics of Photonics
Course objectivesPractical familiarize students with contemporary types of special optical fibers for telecommunication and non telecommunication applications. Measurement parameters for the construction of active fiber amplifiers, fiber lasers and broadband sources. Measurements of optical parameters and physical fiber: birefringent, photonics, nonlinear, capillary. Synthesis of active materials used in the manufacture of vitreous fiber. Embodiments of the optical fiber doped with few lanthanides.
Course contentThe characteristics of special optical fibers in telecommunication and not to telecommunications applications. Methods of measurement parameters for the construction of active amplifiers fiber, lasers fiber and broadband sources. Characteristics of birefringent optical, photonic, nonlinear, capillary fibers. The types and conditions for synthesis of materials used to make optical fibers. Construction of the advanced systems of optical fibers doped with few lanthanides.
Teaching methodslaboratory classes, practical experiments
Assessment methodtests; laboratory classes – evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes and discussion
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has detailed knowledge of the construction of special optical fibers
LO2characterizes contemporary types of optical fibers used in photonics
LO3can choose the optical material in a specific spectral range
LO4analyze knowledge to the application of special fiber optoelectronic systems
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1report on laboratory exercises., discussion during laboratory classes
LO2report on laboratory exercises., discussion during laboratory classesn
LO3report on laboratory exercises., discussion during laboratory classes
LO4report on laboratory exercises., discussion during laboratory classes
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in laboratory classes, etc.15
preparation for laboratory classes15
working on projects, reports, etc.10
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes5
preparation for and participation in tests5
TOTAL:50
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities502.0
Basic references
  1. Digonnet M.: Rare Earth Doped Fiber Lasers and Amplifiers. Marcel Decker, Inc., New York, Bassel 2001.
  2. Mendez A., Morse T. F.: Specialty Optical Fibers Handbook. Elsevier, 2011.
  3. Agrawal G. P.: Nonlinear Fiber Optics. Elsevier, 2013.
Supplementary references
  1. Klein L. C.: Sol-gel processing and applications. Kluwer, London 1994.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMarcin Kochanowicz, PhD, DSc2020-01-26

TCP/IP Networks and Applications

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameTCP/IP Networks and ApplicationsCourse codeIS-FEE-20004W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
300001500No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirementsNetwork technologies or equivalent.
Course objectivesAcquiring detailed knowledge of family of TCP/IP protocols and their applications.
Course contentHistory of family of TCP/IP protocols, their architecture and development. Structure of IP packets in version 4 and 6.Addressing devices in IP networks. IP multicast groups and multicast addressing. Structure ofTCP segmentand UDP datagram. TCP communication session. Flow control in TCP transmission. Auxiliary protocols used in TCP/IP networks: ICMP, ARP, DHCP and other. Static and dynamic routing in TCP/IP networks. Idea of autonomous system (AS). Interior and exterior routing protocols. Obtaining provider independent (PI) IP addresses. VirtualLocal Area Networks (VLAN). IP routing between VLANs. MPLS networks. Network Address Translation protocol (NAT). Traffic aggregation and load balancing in TCP/IP networks. Voice over IP (VoIP) technology. Selected services in TCP/IP networks.
Teaching methodslecture, specialization workshop
Assessment methodlecture: tests; specialization workshop: evaluating the student’s performance in classes, presentation on given subject
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1can describe of a process of layered communications in TCP/IP networks
LO2has comprehensive knowledge of functioning of main and auxiliary protocols used in TCP/IP networks and their cooperation (including application protocols)
LO3is capable of explaining flow control methods used by TCP protocol
LO4is able to describe organization of external routing in the Internet
LO5can differentiate and explain packet forwarding processes in IP networks with classical routing and with label-based switching (MPLS)
LO6depicts advanced configurations of networks and applications including VLAN technology, server clusters and cloud-based solutions
LO7can prepare multimedia presentation on given subject connected with module content
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1tests on lecture contentL
LO2tests on lecture content, evaluating the student’s performance in classesL, SW
LO3tests on lecture content, evaluating the student’s performance in classesL, SW
LO4tests on lecture content, evaluating the student’s performance in classesL, SW
LO5tests on lecture contentL
LO6tests on lecture contentL
LO7evaluating the student’s presentationsSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in specialization workshop15
participation in specialization workshop15
work on presentations20
implementation of project tasks (homework)40
preparation for and participation in exams/tests30
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation452.0
Student workload – practical activities904.0
Basic references
  1. Mahbub H., Raj J.: High performance TCP/IP networking. Prentice Hall, 2003.
  2. Sportack M.: IP addressing fundamentals. Cisco Press, 2002.
  3. Comer D. E.: Internetworking with TCP/IP, vol 1. Prentice Hall, 2005.
  4. Stevens W. R., Wright G. R.: TCP/IP illustrated, vol. 1-3. Addison-Wesley, 2001.
  5. Bourke T.: Server load balancing. O’Reilly Media, 2001.
Supplementary references
  1. Comer D. E., Stevens D. L.: Internetworking with TCP/IP, vol 2. Prentice Hall, 1998.
  2. RFC documents (available at www.rfc-editor.org).
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Zankiewicz, Ph.D. Eng.09.02.2020

Wireless Broadcasting Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameWireless Broadcasting SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-20005W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150150000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe principal objective of lectures is to cover the fundamentals digital television and radio systems and radiotransmitter structures.
Course contentInternational organizations for radiocommunication: ITU, Radiocommunication Rule, elements of radiocommunication law. Structure of radiotransmitter. Digital television – DVB standard. Digital radio – DAB and DRM standards. Digital television in Europe. European standards for radio and television devices. Measurement of selected blocks of transmitter-receiver devices. Antennas and antenna arrays of transmitter systems and its parameters.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class
Assessment methodlecture – oral exam
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has knowledge about principles of basis radiotransmitters devices
LO2has knowledge about principles of DVB and DAB standards family
LO3obtain a skill of measurements electronic blocks with vector network analyzer
LO4obtain a skill of measurements of signals in radioelectronic blocks
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the homeworks and oral examL
LO2evaluating the homeworks and oral examL
LO3evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO4evaluating the student’s reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture and laboratory sessions attendance30
preparation for and participation in exams/tests10
preparation for15
elaboration of lab reports20
TOTAL:75
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation321.5
Student workload – practical activities582.0
Basic references
  1. Hoeg W., Lauterbach T.: Digital Audio Broadcasting. Principles and Applications of Digital Radio. John Wiley & Sons, 2003.
  2. Alencar M.: Digital Television Systems. Cambridge UP 2009.
  3. ETSI EN 300 744 V1.6.1 Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB); Framing structure, channel.
  4. ETSI TS 102 366 V1.2.1 Digital Audio Compression (AC-3, Enhanced AC-3).
Supplementary references
  1. Kalivas G.: Digital Radio System Design.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMaciej Sadowski, Ph.D.13.02.2020

Numerical Methods in Electrical Engineering: Selected Issues

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameNumerical Methods in Electrical Engineering: Selected IssuesCourse codeIS-FEE-20012W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
150001500No. of ECTS credits2
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo acquaint students with chosen numerical methods of solving electrical problems (i.e. electric circuits, electromagnetic phenomena), particularly with algorithms and available applications for the solution of differential equations which correspond to steady state and transient behaviour. To show students how to: (a) use and implement some of the methods to solve problems connected with electrical engineering; (b) use some mathematical and specialized software; (c) assess reliability of numerical results; (d) validate and interpret results of implemented algorithms.
Course contentLecture: Mathematical modelling and computer aided solution of EE problems: the aims and classification of the methods. Taylor’s series and its interpretation, Taylor’s theorem for functions of many variables. Differential approximation of linear and vector operators used in electrical problems. The formulation and properties of the finite difference method (incl. finite difference time domain method). Finite element method. Principles of distributed processing. Paradigms of multi-processing. Coefficients of performance, Amdahl’s law, Gustaffson’s law, the properties and implementation of distributed processing libraries. Specialization workshop: Numerical analysis of chosen circuit and field problems related to electrical engineering with the use of the finite difference and finite element methods. Declaration of boundary conditions, analysis of chosen open boundary problems. Analysis and validation of results.
Teaching methodsstudent can use the common numerical software to solve problems described by differential equations
Assessment methodlecture – final written test (at least 50% of points are necessary to pass); workshop – written reports and tests.
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1can make use of common numerical software to solve problems described by differential equations
LO2understands and knows how to implement a finite difference scheme and a finite element algorithm
LO3is able to interpret and assess the results of computations
LO4understands the principles of distributed processing, its properties and constraints
LO5understands and explains the principles of computer aided modelling, including typical numerical methods and their implementation
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluation of students’ reports and written testsSW
LO2test, evaluation of students’ reportsL, SW
LO3evaluation of students’ reports and written testsSW
LO4test, evaluation of students’ reports and written testsL, SW
LO5testL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
preparation for workshops8
participation in workshops15
work on reports from workshop classes and/or work on home assignments10
participation in student-teacher sessions related to lectures and workshops4
preparation for and attendance at the final test from lectures8
TOTAL:60
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation340.0
Student workload – practical activities450.0
Basic references
  1. Gilat A., Subramaniam V.: Numerical methods for engineers and scientists: an introduction with applications using MATLAB. John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2011.
  2. Elsherbeni A. Z., Demir V.: The finite-difference time-domain method for electromagnetics with MATLAB simulations. SciTech Publishing, Raleigh 2009.
  3. Butcher J. C.: Numerical methods for ordinary differential equations. John Wiley & Sons, 2003.
  4. Evans G., Blackledge J., Yardley P.: Numerical methods for PDE. Springer, 2000.
  5. William H. P.: Numerical recipes: the art of scientific computing. Cambridge Univ.
Supplementary references
  1. Hager G., Wellein G.: Introduction to high performance computing for scientists and engineers. CRC/Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton 2011.
  2. Schafer M.: Computational engineering: introduction to numerical methods. Springer, Berlin 2006.
  3. Mathews J. H., Fink K. D.: Numerical methods using MATLAB. Pearson Education, 2004.
  4. Rosłoniec S.: Numerical methods in electrical engineering. Springer, Berlin 2006.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeBoguslaw Butrylo, D.Sc., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof.2020-02-13

Control Theory

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameControl TheoryCourse codeIS-FEE-20013W
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemesterwinter
3030015000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesAcquainting with control plants models (continuous and discrete-time) in the state space, design of regulators and state observers. Developing the ability to use simulation software for the analysis and synthesis of control systems in the state space.
Course contentLecture: Model of the control plant in the state space: transfer function and state space models, continuous models and discrete models, solution of the state equation, canonical forms, transformation of state space model to its canonical forms, controllability and observability, stability. Pole placement method. State controller, state observer. Optimal control methods: LQR linear-quadratic regulator, Kalman filter (observer), LQG control system. Classes: State space and transfer function models – transformations; canonical forms; controllability and observability; calculation of the state regulator; calculation of the state observer. Project: Simulation study of selected automation plants, design and testing of the PID control system, design of the state controller, design of the state observer, simulation tests of the LQG control system.
Teaching methodsinformative-problem lecture; classes; project classes;
Assessment methodexam, tests
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knows and understands the concept of the state space model
LO2knows and understands the method of poles placement in the design of the state controller and state observer
LO3knows selected methods of optimal control
LO4can use the method of poles placement to determine the controller and the state observer
LO5can design the optimal LQG control system
LO6can use the MATLAB/Simulink software to determine canonical forms, PID controller gains, the state controller and the llinear-gaussian controller, the state observer and Kalman filter
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1lecture: exam
LO2lecture: exam
LO3lecture: exam
LO4classes: two tests; project: evaluation of project completion, current progress in project completion, discussion and activity during the classes
LO5classes: two tests; project: evaluation of project completion, current progress in project completion, discussion and activity during the classes
LO6classes: two tests; project: evaluation of project completion, current progress in project completion, discussion and activity during the classes
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
classes attendance30
project attendance15
preparation for the lecture exam; participation in the exam19
preparation for classes11
preparation for classes completion6
preparation for project classes21
working on projects (including preparation of presentations)6
preparation for projects completion7
participation in teacher-student sessions related to the module subject5
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation823.0
Student workload – practical activities1014.0
Basic references
  1. Dorf R. C., Bishop R. H.: Modern control systems. 10th ed., Prentice Hall, 2005.
  2. Tewari A.: Modern control design: with MATLAB and Simulink. Wiley-IEEE Press, 2001.
  3. Ogata K.: Modern control engineering. 4th ed., Pearson Education International, 2002.
Supplementary references
  1. Bequette B. W.: Process control, modeling, design and simulation. Prentice Hall, 2003.
  2. The MathWorks: Control system toolbox user’s guide.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeZbigniew Kulesza, PhD, DSc2020-02-20

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