Wydział Elektryczny PB

Course description cards, summer 2021/2022

Electronics 1

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectronics 1Course codeIS-FEE-10006S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
1515300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirementsElectrical Circuits 1
Course objectivesTo provide students with basic knowledge of electronic devices. To develop skills in analysis, design and testing of electronic circuits containing diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers.
Course contentDiodes – parameters, I-V characteristics, DC and AC models. Simple circuits containing diodes. Transistors (BJT, FET and MOSFET) – principles of operation, I-V characteristics, equivalent circuits. Transistor biasing. Single stage transistor amplifiers. Small signal analysis of amplifiers. Transistor as a switch. Parameters of operational amplifiers. Ideal OpAmp. Basic applications of operational amplifiers. Analysis and design of electronic devices and circuits using PSPICE.
Teaching methodslecture, class, laboratory class, computer simulations
Assessment methodlecture: written exam; class: two tests; laboratory class: evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the basic operation, characteristics and applications of diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers
LO2can apply knowledge of mathematics and engineering to analyze and design circuits containing diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers
LO3analyzes an electronic circuit using PSpice
LO4uses laboratory instruments for the measurement of circuit parameters and the data acquisition
LO5analyzes and interprets measurement data and prepares reports
LO6uses datasheets and application notes
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, testsL, LC
LO2written exam, testsL, C, LC
LO3verification of preparation for classesLC
LO4tests, evaluation of class workLC
LO5evaluation of reportsLC
LO6evaluation of class workLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in classes15
preparation for classes15
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes20
working on projects, reports25
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/laboratory classes5
preparation for and participation in exams/tests25
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation652.6
Student workload – practical activities1104.4
Basic references
  1. Sedra A.S., Smith K. C.: Microelectronic Circuits. Oxford University Press, 2004.
  2. Muret P.: Fundamentals of Electronics 1 : Electronic Components and Elementary Functions, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2017 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central)
Supplementary references
  1. Boysen E., Kybett H.: Complete Electronics Self-Teaching Guide with Projects, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2012 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central)
  2. Singh S.: Electronics Engineering, Alpha Science International, New Delhi, 2014 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central)
  3. Westcott S., Westcott J. R.: Basic Electronics: Theory and Practice, Mercury Learning & Information, 2015 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central)
  4. Saggio G.: Principless of analog electronic. CRC Press, 2014.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Karpiuk, Ph.D.23.02.2021

Microprocessor Technique and Microcontrollers

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameMicroprocessor Technique and MicrocontrollersCourse codeIS-FEE-10009S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesKnowledge about the basic problems of the microprocessor technique and microcontrollers. Skills on programming of microprocessor systems in low-level and high-level languages.
Course contentLecture: Binary arithmetic. Basic topics of the microprocessor engineering. Microprocessor system structures and main components: processors, memories, basic peripheral devices, standard buses, additional circuits. Interrupt systems. Methods of input/output device service. Input/output binary and analogue devices. Exemplary microcontroller family: standard structure, instruction list, peripherals, interrupts, extensions. Laboratory classes: Practical exercises in programming of basic algorithms and I/O device service in machine- and high-level language.
Teaching methodslecture: presentations, laboratory classes: set of exercises
Assessment methodwritten exam and reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the activity of microprocessor, microcontrollers and whole microprocessor systemEEE_W07
LO2distinguishes: types of processors, interrupt systems, semiconductor memories, peripheral device service techniquesEEE_W07
LO3uses suitable programming toolsEEE_W03
LO4writes software servicing the microcontroller I/O devicesEEE_U07
LO5writes software implementation of designed algorithmEEE_U07
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam test on lecture contentL
LO2written exam test on lecture contentL
LO3evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO4evaluating the student’s reports and written testsLC
LO5evaluating the student’s reports and written testsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
individual work on lecture topics15
preparation for exam10
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes and drawing up reports40
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes10
preparation for laboratory classes tests10
exam and lab-classes tests attendance5
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation753.0
Student workload – practical activities823.0
Basic references
  1. William Stallings: Computer Organization and Architecture. ISBN:
  2. Muhammad Ali Mazidi, Sarmad Naimi, Sepehr Naimi: The AVR Microcontroller and Embedded Systems. ISBN: 0138003319; 781 p, 2011, Pearson/Prentice Hall.
  3. Stuart Ball: Embedded Microprocessor Systems. ISBN: 0750675349; 432 p, 2002, Elsevier Newnes.
Supplementary references
  1. Lech Grodzki: Presentations for lecture. Updated each semester.
  2. Lech Grodzki: Manuals for laboratory classes. Updated each semester.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Control Engineering and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeLech Grodzki, Ph.D.15.02.2021

Final Project

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameFinal ProjectCourse codeIS-FEE-10022S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
0000000No. of ECTS credits12
Entry requirements5/6 semesters of engineer level in appropriate area
Course objectivesFamiliriazing student with the methodology of solving engineer problems. Deepening skills of appropriate choice and use of literature references and the skill of use of scientific and technical data bases. Training the ability of analyzing the literature to identify the possible solutions of the problem stated in the engineer project. Obtaining the skill of formulating the engineer problem and the choice of the methodology and tools to solve it (including calculation tools and computer programmes). Achieving the skill of preparing plan and schedule of the process of the engineer task realization. Improving skill of preparing the report of the engineer task realization. Creating the skill of the design assumptions' verification, concluding and evaluation of achieved results.
Course contentKnowledge and skills connected with the subject of the project – acquisition of information from the literature. Characterization of the possible solutions of the problem stated in the engineer project derived from the current state of knowledge. Knowledge of the development trends within the chosen area allowing to choose the solution of the problem. Planning the realization of the engineer problem. Using computer tools and techniques in order to realize or support the solution of the task. Verification of the solution by means of the methods and tools of theoretical and experimental analysis. Methodology of characterization and analyzing the engineer task and forming the conclusions. Development of the results and the documentation of executed tasks.
Teaching methods
Assessment method
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1collects knowledge from the literature and evaluates the applicability to solve chosen technical problem
LO2individually plans the solution of the engineer problem, specifying the method and the execution time
LO3implements engineering task and prepares the development containing documentation and verification of the results
LO4formulates objectives for the various stages of solving engineering tasks, suggesting methods of implementation and verification of a solution
LO5can design a measurement system implementing engineering design or research task
LO6can evaluate relevance and use appropriate methods and tools used to achieve engineering tasks
LO7has the ability and understands the need to improve his/hers qualifications in order to enhance and update expertise technical knowledge
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO2positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO3positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO4positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO5positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO6positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
LO7positive evaluation of engineering work and the result of defense
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationself work on the subject, consultations, discussions with the supervisor300
TOTAL:300
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation150.5
Student workload – practical activities30012.0
Basic references
  1. specialized literature – adequate to the subject of the project.
Supplementary references
Organisational unit conducting the courseFaculty of Electrical EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeteachers of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering15.02.2020

Automotive Lighting

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameAutomotive LightingCourse codeIS-FEE-10023S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150150000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo familiarize students withautomotive lighting. Presentation of design methods of lightingequipment inautomotive lighting. Classification and investigation of light fittings used in automotive lighting. Presentation of methods of luminous flux emmision verification in automotive lighting. Examination of the characteristics of road lighting and horizontal and vertical marking.
Course contentAutomotive lighting. Light sources for automotive lighting equipment. Automotive lighting control systems. Headlamps and signal lamps design methods. Photometric measurements of automobile fittings. Construction of daytime running lamps, road lamps, signal lamps and others. Adaptive systems in automotive lighting.
Teaching methodslaboratory experiments, consultations, lecture, self-work, discussion
Assessment methodlecture: written exam; laboratory class – verification of preparation for classes, evaluation of the reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1lists and distinguishes appropriate lighting equipment used in automotive engineering
LO2describes the design principles of automobile lamps
LO3measures required illumination distributions caused by automobile lamps
LO4selects components and light sources for automobile lamps properly
LO5classifies and explains control methods in automotive lighting
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam, duscussion during laboratory classesL, LC
LO2examL
LO3evaluation of the report on exercise, discussion during the laboratory classesLC
LO4exam, duscussion during laboratory classesL, LC
LO5exam, duscussion during laboratory classesL, LC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationattending the lecture15
participation in the laboratory classes15
preparation for the laboratory classes20
preparation of laboratory reports or doing homework assignments (homework)20
participation in consultations10
preparation to the exam30
TOTAL:110
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation351.5
Student workload – practical activities351.5
Basic references
  1. Wordenweber B., Wallaschek J., Boyce P., Hoffman D.: Automotive lighting and human vision. Springer, 2007.
  2. Bauer H.: Automotive handbook. Bosch, 2000.
Supplementary references
  1. E/ECE/TRANS/505, addendum 36, regulation no. 37, rev. 5: Uniform provisions concerning the approval of filament lamps for use in approved lamp units on power; Driven vehicles and of their trailers.
  2. E/ECE/TRANS/505, addendum 3, regulation no. 4, rev. 2: Uniform provisions for the approval of devices for the illumination of rear registration plates of motor vehicles (except motor cycles) and their trailers.
  3. E/ECE/TRANS/505, addendum 48, regulation no. 48, rev. 6: Uniform provisions concerning the approval of vehicles with regard to the installation of lighting and light; Signalling devices.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMaciej Zajkowski, Ph.D. Eng. Urszula Błaszczak, Łukasz Budzynski30.01.2020

Control Engineering and Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameControl Engineering and SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10024S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300003000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirementsFundamentals of Control Engineering
Course objectivesThis course extends the students' knowledge of state space approach to analyze and synthesis of control systems. Workshops will learn how to design and simulate considered systems in specialized software.
Course contentDescription of multivariable dynamical systems in state space and by the use of transfer matrix. Controlability and observability of linear systems, Kalman decomposition. Modal control, observer synthesis, use of observer to modal control. Linear matrix inequalities. Computer aided design and simulations of control systems.
Teaching methodslecture, specialized workshops
Assessment methodwritten exam (lecture), evaluation of reports (workshops)
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1express a dynamical system in state-space form
LO2classify models of multivariable dynamical systems
LO3desribe procedure of synthesis of modal control and state observer
LO4use an observer to estimate a state of dynamical system
LO5use specialized software to design and analyze of control systems
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam, evaluation of reportsL, SW
LO2tests on lecture contentL
LO3tests on lecture contentL
LO4exam, evaluation of reportsL, SW
LO5evaluation of reportsSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
individual work on lecture topics30
preparation for and participation in exam45
participation in workshops30
work on reports30
TOTAL:165
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation602.0
Student workload – practical activities1054.0
Basic references
  1. Norman N. S.: Control systems engineering 5th ed. John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2008.
  2. Friedland B.: Control System Design: An Introduction to State-Space Methods. Dover Publ. Inc. 2005.
  3. Williams II R. L., Lawrence D. A.: Linear State-Space Control Systems. John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey 2007.
  4. Kaczorek T.: Linear Control Systems, vol. 1 and 2. Research Studies Press, 1993.
  5. Doyle J.C., Francis B.A., Tannenbaum A.R.: Feedback Control Theory. Macmillan, 1992.
Supplementary references
  1. Kaczorek T.: Polynomial and Rational Matrices: Applications in Dynamical Systems Theory. Springer-Verlag, 2006.
  2. Rogowski K.: Presentations for lecture (on-line available).
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeKrzysztof Rogowski31-03-2016

Control of Electrical Drives 2

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameControl of Electrical Drives 2Course codeIS-FEE-10025S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150300000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesBrushless DC motor drives and stepping motor drives. The structure and the features of the Field Oriented Control of electrical drives with permanent magnets synchronous motor and asynchronous motor. Acquiring experience by students in the configuration, maintenance and operation of automatically controlled electrical drives.
Course contentLecture: Control of DC motors in the field-weakening region. Scalar and Field Oriented Control (FOC) of AC of induction motors/generators. Park and Clarke transformations. The vector control of synchronous motors/generators supplied by power converter. The mathematical models of electrical motors and of DC and AC power converters. Servo drive systems. Control methods of stepping motor. Examples of the use of microprocessor control systems in electric drives. Current, speed and position sensors (current transducers, encoders, resolvers, etc.). Laboratory classes: Experimental exercises with automatically controlled electrical drives. Investigation into four quadrant electrical and mechanical energy conversion in electric drive with DTC-SVM, induction motor and induction generator. Investigation into position control system containing Field Oriented Control of induction motor. Investigation into speed control system of DC motor in field weakening region. Investigation into speed control system of Brushless DC Motor (BLDCM). Investigation into Field Oriented Control (FOC) of Permanent Magnets Synchronous Motor (PMSM).
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory experiments, demonstration, problem-based learning, small group teaching, work on a project
Assessment methodlecture, laboratory experiments, demonstration, problem-based learning, small group teaching
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1analyzes structure of a simple servo drive
LO2conduct basic research of current, speed and position control subsystems
LO3performs basic configuration and operation of automatically controlled drives
LO4interprets the results from basic laboratory investigation of electrical drives
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1oral tests on lecture contentL
LO2assessment of the drive operation, evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO3assessment of the drive operation, evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO4assessment of the drive operation, evaluating the student’s reportsP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes30
work on laboratory classes reports30
preparation for tests10
TOTAL:115
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation452.0
Student workload – practical activities903.0
Basic references
  1. Boldea I., Nasar S.A.: Electric Drives. 2nd Edition, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, 2006.
  2. Weidauer J.: Electrical drives: principles, planning, applications, solutions. Erlangen, Publicis Publishing, 2014.
  3. Seung-Ki S.: Control of Electric Machine Drive Systems. IEEE Press, John Willey & Sons, Publication, USA, 2011.
  4. Alahakoon S.: Digital Control Techniques for Sensorless Electrical Drives. VDM Verlag Dr Muller, Germany, 2009.
  5. Wilamowski B. M., Irwin J. D.: Control and Mechatronics. Taylor & Francis, USA, 2011.
Supplementary references
  1. Krause P., Wasynczuk O., Sudhoff S.: Analysis of Electric Machinery and Drive Systems. Willey-Interscience, USA, 2002.
  2. Vukosavic S. N.: Digital Control of Electric Drives. Springer, 2007.
  3. Bin Wu, Yonpqiang Lang, Navid Zargari, Samir Kouro: Power Conversion and control of wind energy systems. IEEE Press, John Willey & Sons, Publication, Canada, 2011.
  4. Veltman A., Pulle Duco W. J., Doncker R. W. D.: Fundamental of Electrical Drives. Springer, Netherlands, 2007.
  5. Wilamowski B. M., Irwin J. D.: Power electronics and motor drives. Boca Raton, CRC/Taylor & Francis, 2011.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Andrzejewski, PhD Eng.26.02.2021

Digital Signal Processing

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameDigital Signal ProcessingCourse codeIS-FEE-10026S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe aim of the course is to acquaint the students with the basics of the digital signal processing. Student is familiar and can apply methods of signal analysis in time and frequency domains. Student is able to use methods of digital filter design and is familiar with issues of digital filter analysis and implementation.
Course contentLecture: Areas of application of digital signal processing methods. Signal classification. Sampling of continuous time signals: the sampling theorem, anti-aliasing filter, quantization, practical aspects of A/D and D/A conversion, digital resampling. Properties and application of the Discrete Fourier Transform; Fast Fourier Transform algorithms; analysis of nonstationary signals. Z-transform: properties and application. Description methods of discrete time signals and systems: difference equation, impulse response, Z-transform, transfer function, frequency response, state space representation. Overview of digital filter analysis, synthesis and application: infinite impulse response filters, finite impulse response filters, commonly used filters, time and frequency domain parameters, windowing, linear phase filters. Stability. Linear and circular convolution. DSP implementation issues. Laboratory classes: Sampling of continuous time signals, anti-aliasing filter, quantization; properties and application of the Fast Fourier Transform; impulse response, frequency response, digital filter analysis, filter synthesis, IIR and FIR filters, linear phase filters.
Teaching methodslecture, problem solving, laboratory experiments
Assessment methodlecture: written exam; laboratory class: evaluation the student’s reports and performance in classes.
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1is familiar with issues of sampling of continuous time signals and analysis of discrete-time signals
LO2knows description methods of digital systems and can describe methods of digital filters synthesis and analysis
LO3performs sampling of continuous time signals and performs spectral analysis
LO4performs design process of the basic digital filters and performs properties verification of their implementation
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1examL
LO2examL
LO3evaluation of student’s reports and performance in classesLC
LO4evaluation of student’s reports and performance in classesLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
preparation for and participation in exams35
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes20
work on reports30
participation in student-teacher sessions (2L+3LC)5
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation652.5
Student workload – practical activities833.0
Basic references
  1. Oppenheim A. V., Schafer R.: Discrete-time Signal Processing. Prentice Hall, 2010.
  2. Rao K., Swamy M.: Digital Signal Processing. Theory and Practice. Springer, 2018.
  3. Rawat T. K.: Digital Signal Processing. Oxford University Press, 2015.
  4. Gazi O.: Understanding Digital Signal Processing. Springer, 2018.
  5. Hussain Z. M., Sadik A. Z.: Digital Signal Processing. Springer, 2011.
Supplementary references
  1. Manolakis D. G., Ingle V. K.: Applied Digital Signal Processing: Theory and Practice. Cambridge University Press, 2011.
  2. Schilling R. A., Harris S. L., Introduction to digital signal processing using MATLAB. Cengage Learning, 2012.
  3. Smith S. K.: Digital Signal Processing; A Practical Guide for Engineers and Scientists. Elsevier Science, 2003.
  4. Gopi E. S.: Multi-Disciplinary Digital Signal Processing: A Functional Approach Using Matlab. Springer, 2018.
  5. Lyons R.: Understanding Digital Signal Processing. Prentice Hall, 2001.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeDariusz Jańczak, PhD, DSc24.04.2020

Electrical Circuits 2

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectrical Circuits 2Course codeIS-FEE-10027S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
1530150000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo receive the knowledge of main rules describing the phenomenas and dependences in AC circuits in steady state and DC transient state circuits. To have the ability to calculate useful parameters of DC transient state circuit and 3-phase loads in a steady state.
Course contentSelf inductance and mutual inductance. Analysis of circuits with magnetic coupling. Air transformer. Calculations and measurement of power in 3-phase systems. Balanced and unbalanced 3-phase circuits. Analysis of transient state in linear RLC circuits. Laboratory experiments for the phenomenas described above. Applying the simulations for analysis and design of circuits. Interpretation of results.
Teaching methodslecture, classes, laboratory experiments, simulations
Assessment methodproblems are presented for students at the beginning of semester. The evaluation is performing during personal discussion on several problems concerning all indicated topics
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1explains the physical side of mutual element and describes the mathematical model of the circuits
LO2analyses the 3-phase circuits with different configuration
LO3is able to provide the financial effect of compensation of reactive power in 3-phase systems
LO4understands the effect of commutations in electrical circuits containing the reactive elements
LO5makes the verification of results of analysis by the use of simulation
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problemsL
LO2evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problemsL, C, LC
LO3evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessmentC, LC
LO4evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessmentC, LC
LO5evaluating the student’s solutions of presented problems, personal assessmentC, LC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
attending the class sessions30
attending and providing the laboratory class experiments15
self-working on learning and preparing the problems solutions20
preparation for the experiments at laboratory class20
preparation for and participation in exams/tests35
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes and lecture15
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation753.0
Student workload – practical activities1004.0
Basic references
  1. Thomas R. E., Rosa A. J., Toussaint G.J.: The Analysis & Design of Linear Circuits. 6th ed, Wiley Inc. 2009.
  2. Tung L. J., Kwan B. W.: Circuit Analysis. World Scientific 2001.
  3. Irvin J. D., Nelms R. M.: Basic Engineering Circuits Analysis. International Student Version. John Willey & Sons Inc. 2008.
  4. https://www.khanacademy.org/science/electrical-engineering.
Supplementary references
  1. Auer M. E.: Three Phase Circuits (https://pl.scribd.com/document/248006055/1-Three-Phase-Circuits-pdf).
  2. https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b&q=micro+cap+manual
  3. https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b&q=pspice+manual+9.1
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeJaroslaw Makal, Ph.D. Eng.10.01.2020

Electrical Machines 2

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectrical Machines 2Course codeIS-FEE-10029S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirementsElectrical Machines 1
Course objectivesAchievement of skills of analysis of DC and synchronous machines.
Course contentDC machines: construction, principles of operation, mathematical model. Direct current machine systems. Steady state with different conditions of power supply and load. Synchronous machines: construction, principles of operation and mathematical models. Torque of synchronous machines. Generators and motors.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class
Assessment methodlecture: written exam; laboratory class: evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1selects the measurement methods for basic research of electrical machines, analyzes test results, assesses the state of saturation of the magnetic circuit
LO2selects speed control methods for DC machines, interprets the behavior of the DC machines for various values of supplying voltages and load torque
LO3interprets influence of changes in the excitation current and load torque for synchronous generators and DC machines
LO4describes the actual status and construction development trends in electrical machines
LO5associates the connection of electrical machines with other areas of knowledge in the discipline of electrical engineering
LO6can work in an organized laboratory group
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating student’s preparation for laboratory tests, examL, LC
LO2evaluating student’s preparation for laboratory tests, examL, LC
LO3evaluating student’s preparation for laboratory tests, examL, LC
LO4examL
LO5examL
LO6discussion on the report of the laboratory tests, observation of work in the laboratoryLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in workshop activities30
preparation for classes30
preparation for and participation in exams/tests30
elaboration of workshop’s reports30
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation602.0
Student workload – practical activities903.0
Basic references
  1. Morris N.: Electrical & electronic engineering principles. Longman Group, 1994.
  2. Ryff P. F.: Electric machinery. Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1988.
  3. Theodore W.: Electrical machines, drives and power systems. Pearson Education, New Jersey, 2006.
Supplementary references
  1. Sen P. G.: Principles of electric machines and power electronics. J. Wiley & Sons, 1997.
  2. Chapman S. J.: Electric machinery fundamentals. Mc Graw Hil, 2005.
  3. Morris N. M.: Electrical and electronic engineering principles. Longman Group, 1994.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAdam Sołbut, Ph.D. Eng.05.02.2020

Electronics 2

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectronics 2Course codeIS-FEE-10030S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
1515300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirementsElectronics 1
Course objectivesThe objective of this course is to provide students with deep understanding of advanced analogue circuits. The laboratory component of the course provides students with an opportunity to design, simulate and test various circuits discussed in class.
Course contentFrequency response of single transistor amplifiers. Linear applications of operational amplifiers. Nonlinear applications of operational amplifiers. Voltage comparators. Current sources. Active filters. Output stages and power amplifiers. Voltage regulators. RC oscillators. Optoelectronic devices and circuits. Several lab and homework assignments in this class will require the use of PSpice software.
Teaching methodslecture, class, laboratory class, computer simulations
Assessment methodlecture: written exam; class: two tests; laboratory class: verification of preparation for classes, evaluation of reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the basic principles of operation of the electronic circuits
LO2applies knowledge of mathematics and engineering to analysis and design of analog circuits
LO3uses PSPICE to analysis and design of electronic circuits
LO4can prepare and conduct experiments using datasheets and application notes
LO5analyzes and interprets measurement data and prepares reports
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, testsL, LC
LO2written exam, testsL, C, LC
LO3verification of preparation for classes, evaluation of reportsLC
LO4tests, evaluation of class work, evaluation of reportsLC
LO5evaluation of reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in classes15
preparation for classes15
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes20
working on projects, reports25
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/laboratory classes5
preparation for and participation in exams/tests25
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation652.6
Student workload – practical activities1104.4
Basic references
  1. Sedra A. S., Smith K. C.: Microelectronic Circuits. Oxford University Press, 2004.
  2. Sinclair I., Dunton J.: Practical Electronics Handbook, Elsevier Science & Technology, 2006 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central).
Supplementary references
  1. Boysen E., Kybett H.: Complete Electronics Self-Teaching Guide with Projects. John Wiley & Sons, 2012 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central).
  2. Singh S.: Electronics Engineering. Alpha Science International, New Delhi, 2014 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central).
  3. Westcott S., Westcott J. R.: Basic Electronics: Theory and Practice. Mercury Learning & Information, 2015 (Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central).
  4. Saggio G.: Principles of analog electronic. CRC Press, 2014.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Karpiuk, Ph.D.24.02.2021

Field Programmable Gate Arrays

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameField Programmable Gate ArraysCourse codeIS-FEE-10031S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150300000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe target of this course is to introduce the students to the structural design of FPGAs in the way, which is appropriate for both programmers and hardware engineers.
Course contentInternal FPGAs architecture, clock signal frequency synthesis, signal I/O standards. CAD software for designing FPGAs – Intel Quartus II software. Design flow of FPGAs. VHDL: fundamentalunits, librarydeclarations, entity, architecture. Concurrent code. Sequential code.State machines. Packages and components. Functions and procedures. IEEE standard packages. Techniques description of the project, simulation, implementation and programming of FPGAs. Constructing a digital circuit using FPGAs. Synthesis of complex hierarchical designs. Synthesis of digital systems using standard prototype modules. Support for external devices via FPGA: PWM signal modulation, I2C and SPI bus control.
Teaching methodsdescribes the basic features and properties of FPGAs
Assessment methodlecture – test, laboratory classes – evaluation of reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1describes the basic features and properties of FPGAs
LO2recognizes the syntax of the VHDL statements
LO3uses the features of the CAD FPGA platform
LO4designs simple digital systems in programmable structures
LO5uses VHDL to describe the system and designs new components
LO6combines various description techniques to design complex systems
LO7can run a simple digital system using conventional prototype modules
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the student’s testL
LO2evaluating the student’s testL
LO3evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO4evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO5evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO6evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO7evaluating the student’s reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes30
working on reports25
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes and laboratory classes5
preparation for and participation in test20
TOTAL:125
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation471.5
Student workload – practical activities1024.0
Basic references
  1. Floyd L. T.: Digital Fundamentals with PLD Programming. Prentice Hall, 2005.
  2. Volnei A. Pedroni: Circuit Design with VHDL. MIT, Cambridge, London, 2004.
  3. Jha N. K., Gupta S.: Testing of Digital Systems. Cambridge University Press, 2003.
  4. IEEE Standard 1076-2008 VHDL-200X.
  5. Hamblen J., Hall T., Furman M.: Rapid Prototyping of Digital Systems. Springer, 2008
Supplementary references
  1. Terasic Inc.: DE2-115 User Manual. www.terasic.com, 2010.
  2. My First FPGA for Altera DE2-115 Board. www.terasic.com, 2010.
  3. My First Nios II for Altera DE2-115 Board. www.terasic.com, 2010.
  4. Pedroni V.: Circuit Design with VHDL. MIT Press, 2004.
  5. Hwang E.: ELECTRONiX: Digital Logic and Microprocessor Design with VHDL. La Sierra University, 2005.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMarian Gilewski, Ph.D. Eng.31.01.2020

Fundamentals of Telecommunication

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameFundamentals of TelecommunicationCourse codeIS-FEE-10032S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300150000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe aim of the course is to learn basic knowledge in the field of telecommunications, allowing for more effective studying and understanding the specific items they place in all the studies on the direction. The result of the course is to learn the main areas of the discipline, their interrelationships, and the fundamental rights and restrictions associated with the analyzed issues.
Course contentElements of communication system, source of information, communication channels, fundamentals of information theory; analog modulation systems (DSB-AM, DSB-SC-AM, SSB-SC-AM, FM) and frequency division multiplexing; noise in analog communication systems especially: physical sources ofnoise, noise properties ofsystems, noise in analog modulation systems; discrete signals: sampling theory, pulse code modulation, PCM transmission, line coding, time division multiplexing, digital modulation (ASK, FSK, PSK, DPSK, QAM); noise in digital communication systems: statistical decision theory, distortion in PCM systems, digital modulation in noisy conditions, matched filtering and correlation detection; properties of selected telecommunication systems and technologies.
Teaching methodslecture and laboratory class
Assessment methodlecture: tests; laboratory class: evaluation of reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has an elementary knowledge of modern wired and wireless communication systems and networks, makes their classification and defines the services provided therein
LO2has a theoretical basis for analysis of signals and systems and is able to compare properties of analog and digital modulation systems
LO3has a theoretical basis on the sources of disturbances and how they impact on the transmitted signals, he can compare the characteristics of wired and wireless transmission media
LO4has hands-on skills in maintenance and operation of digital switching system
LO5measures the basic properties of the transmission mediums
LO6can work in a group and distributes tasks to each person
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1tests on lecture content, evaluating the student’s reportsL, LC
LO2tests on lecture contentL
LO3tests on lecture contentL
LO4evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO5evaluating the student’s reportsLC
LO6evaluation of the student’s performance in classesLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in laboratory classes15
preparation for laboratory classes15
work on reports30
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the lecture and laboratory classes10
preparation for and participation in exams/tests30
TOTAL:130
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation552.0
Student workload – practical activities702.0
Basic references
  1. Couch L. W.: Digital and analog communication systems. Prentice-Hall, 2001.
Supplementary references
  1. Freeman R. L.: Fundamentals of Telecommunication. Willey-IEEE Press, May 2005.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeKrzysztof Konopko, Ph.D. Eng.07.02.2020

High Frequency Techniques 1

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameHigh Frequency Techniques 1Course codeIS-FEE-10033S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
301500000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirementsmathematics, physics, circuits and signals, electromagnetic field theory
Course objectivesThe aim of the course is to acquaint the students with basic topics of high frequency techniques: components, instruments, measurements, applications. Training skills of calculation of voltages and currents in transmission lines and solving simple problems of impedance matching.
Course contentExamples of applications of high frequency devices and systems. Electromagnetic waves in transmission lines (coaxial lines, striplines, microstrips) and in waveguides. Wave types (TEM, TE and TM) and wave modes. Definitions of current, voltage, characteristic impedance. Impedance matching (narrowband and broadband). The Smith chart. Multiport circuits. The scattering matrix. Passive microwave elements: reactance irises, matched loads, stub tuners, attenuators, phase shifters, power dividers, hybrid junctions, directional couplers. Resonators. Ferrite devices. Semiconductor devices. MEMS. Basics of high frequency measurements. Network analyzers.
Teaching methodslecture, class
Assessment methodlecture: discussion on homework reports; class: two tests
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has detailed knowledge on the principles of operation of electronic high frequency components
LO2has elementary knowledge on materials used in the high frequency technology
LO3has ordered, theoretical knowledge on guiding of high frequency waves
LO4knows and understands basic methods of measurements of parameters of high frequency devices
LO5can get information from the literature and other sources, also in a foreign language
LO6can use the known mathematical description for solving basic problems concerning transmission lines
LO7can apply the Smith chart for analysis of simple impedance matching problems
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the student’s homework, and discussion on itL
LO2evaluating the student’s homework, and discussion on itL
LO3evaluating the student’s homework, and discussion on itL
LO4evaluating the student’s homework, and discussion on itL
LO5evaluating the student’s homework, and discussion on itL, C
LO6tests on classes contentC
LO7tests on classes contentC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
CalculationLecture attendance28
discussion on homework reports2
participation in classes13
tests related to the classes2
preparation for classes5
homework reports30
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the class15
preparation for exams/tests40
TOTAL:135
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation602.0
Student workload – practical activities753.0
Basic references
  1. Collin R. E.: Foundations for microwave engineering. IEEE Press, 2001.
  2. White J. F.: High frequency techniques – an introduction to RF and microwave engineering. Wiley, 2004.
  3. Elliott R. S.: An introduction to guided waves and microwave circuits. Prentice-Hall, 1998.
Supplementary references
  1. Hickman I.: Practical radio frequency handbook. Newnes, 2002.
  2. Bowick C.: RF circuit design. Newnes, 1982.
  3. IEEE Microwave Magazine.
  4. Aniserowicz K.: lecture notes.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeProf. Karol Aniserowicz12.02.2020

High Voltage Technique

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameHigh Voltage TechniqueCourse codeIS-FEE-10034S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300300000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThe principal objective of lectures is to cover the fundamentals of high-voltage test technique, generation and measurement of high voltages, electrical breakdown in gases, solid and liquid dielectric, travelling waves in high voltage lines, lightning and overvoltage protection and topresent the basics of high voltage insulation design.Skills of performing measurements, tests and studies on high voltage generators, electrical withstand of insulators and insulating materials and measurements of high voltages and high currents. Skills of safe work with high voltage electrical devices and apparatus.
Course contentLecture High voltage test technique. Generation and measurement of high alternating and direct voltages. Generation and measurements of impulse voltages and currents. Dielectric loss and capacitance measurements. Partial discharge measurements. Disturbances in high voltage laboratory. Electrical breakdown in gases, solid and liquid dielectric. Travelling waves in high voltage lines. Reflection of travelling waves. Reflection of travelling waves against transformers. Lightning, mechanism, philosophy of protection, lightning protection of structures. Lightning and switching transients in power system. Protection against overvoltages. Surge protective devices. Insulation coordination. Construction elements for high voltage circuits. High voltages cables and capacitors. Design, materials and testing. High voltage Transformers. Materials and testing. External insulation. Design and testing. Laboratory class Measurement of voltage distribution across an insulator string. Measurements of electrical withstand of air subjected to high voltage of AC, DC and surge type. Methods of measurement of high voltages. Investigation of surge generators. Investigation of oil insulation.
Teaching methodslecture and multimedia presentation, experiments in laboratory class
Assessment methodlecture: final written test; laboratory class: evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1develop an in-depth understanding and technical competence of HV test techniques, especially generation and measurement of high AC, AC and impulse voltages and impulse currents, partial discharge, dielectric loss and capacitance measurements; plans, selects appropriate equipment and performs measurement of high surge voltages and surge currents
LO2develop an in-depth technical competence in lightning and overvoltage protection of structures
LO3develop an in-depth understanding of electrical breakdown and withstand of gas, liquid and solid insulators or insulating materials; performs measurements and tests on electrical withstand of gas, liquid and solid insulators or insulating materials
LO4develop an in-depth understanding in the area of lightning power systems protection; achieve a thorough knowledge and technical competence in a wide range of lightning and switching overvoltage protection in HV power station, HV lines and insulation coordination
LO5develop an in-depth understanding of the theory and applications in power systems of High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission and Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS)
LO6define and characterizes methods of generation and measurement of high voltages and high currents; describes basic characteristics and methods of investigation of electrical withstand of gas, liquid and solid insulators; plans, selects appropriate equipment and performs measurement of high voltages
LO7elaborates, illustrates, interprets and compares obtained measurement or test results and draws aproprate conclusions
LO8applies rules of safety and hygiene of work with high voltages; can work in a team
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam on lecture contentverification of preparation for laboratory classesL, LC
LO2exam on lecture contentL
LO3exam on lecture contentverification of preparation for laboratory classesL, LC
LO4exam on lecture contentL
LO5exam on lecture contentL
LO6exam on lecture contentverification of preparation for laboratory classesL, LC
LO7work on reports from laboratory classesLC
LO8participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classesLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation for laboratory classes18
work on reports from laboratory classes24
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the lecture5
participation in student-teacher sessions related to laboratory classes5
preparation and performance of presentation on selected topic14
preparation for and participation in exam24
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation742.5
Student workload – practical activities773.0
Basic references
  1. Naidu M. S., Kamaraju V.: High voltage engineering. Mc. Graw Hill, 2003.
  2. Holzhauen J. P., Vosloo W. L.: High voltage engineering. Practice and theory. Mc. Graw Hill, 2009.
  3. Cooray V.: Lightning protection. IEEE, 2009.
  4. Kuffel E., Zaengl W. S., Kuffel J.: High voltage engineering fundamentals. Newness, 2000.
  5. Wadhwa C. L.: High voltage engineering. New Age International Publishers, 2007.
Supplementary references
  1. Kind D., Feser K.: High voltage test technique. Newness, 2001.
  2. Cooray V.: The lightning flash. IEEE, 2004.
  3. Beyer M., Boeck W., Moeller K., Zaengl W.: Hochspannungstechnik. Theoretische und praktische grundlagen für die anwendungen. Springer, 1989.
  4. Zulkurnain A.: Fast transient response of high voltage surge arrester. VDM, 2010.
  5. Hasse P., Wiesinger J., Zischank W.: Handbuch für blitzschutz und erdung. Pflaum, 2006.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeRenata Markowska, Ph.D. Eng.07.02.2020

Security and Reliability of Network Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameSecurity and Reliability of Network SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10035S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300001500No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesAcquiring knowledge of methods and techniques used to provide secure access, transmission and storage of information.
Course contentFundamentals of cryptography. Conditions of providing data confidentiality and integrity. Symmetric and asymmetric cipher algorithms e.g. DES, RSA. Hash functions. Digital signatures. Idea of Public Key Infrastructure (PKI). Sources and types of security threats to network systems. Security threats to host and server applications. Security threats to web applications. Methods of protection against selected kinds of threats. Firewall systems, antivirus protection, intrusion detection systems (IDS), idea of honeypots. Methods of authentication and authorization in network systems. Conception of security politics. Examples of complex security politics. Security audit and penetration tests. Systems for data backuping and restoring. Array of disks (RAID). Network storage systems: Storage Area Network (SAN), Network Area Storage (NAS).
Teaching methodslecture, specialization workshop
Assessment methodlecture: tests; specialization workshop: evaluating the student’s performance in classes, presentation on given subject
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1explains features, types, and applications of encryption algorithms and hash functions and distinguishing their functionalities
LO2describes technologies used for providing secure users and devices authentication in network systems
LO3characterizes methods of providing information confidentiality and integrity
LO4depicts technologies used in information systems to provide secure and reliable data storage
LO5identifies and characterizes sources and types of threats to network systems
LO6setts up simple networks, configuring network settings in PC workstations and in choosing the proper means that can be used to protect data systems against the particular threats and explains their features
LO7prepares multimedia presentation on given subject connected with module content
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1tests on lecture content, evaluating the student’s performance in classesL, SW
LO2tests on lecture content, evaluating the student’s performance in classesL, SW
LO3tests on lecture content, evaluating the student’s performance in classesL, SW
LO4tests on lecture contentL
LO5tests on lecture contentL
LO6tests on lecture contentL
LO7evaluating the student’s presentationsSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationattending the class sessions45
preparation for specialization worshop15
work on presentations20
preparation for and participation in exams/tests20
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation451.5
Student workload – practical activities502.0
Basic references
  1. Stallings W.: Cryptography and network security: principles and practice. Prentice Hall, 2010.
  2. Anderson R. J.: Security engineering: a guide to building dependable distributed systems. Wiley, 2008.
  3. Cole E., Krutz R. L., Conley J.: Network security bible.
Supplementary references
  1. Chestwick W. R., Bellovin S. M., Rubin A. D.: Firewalls and internet security. Addison Wesley, 2003.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Zankiewicz, Ph.D. Eng.26.01.2020

Techniques of Presentation

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameTechniques of PresentationCourse codeIS-FEE-10036S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00000030No. of ECTS credits2
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo receive the practice of presentation of technical topics. To be familiarised with public presentations and the methods of decrease the stress and control the emotions. Students will develop oral presentation skills that will assist them in successfully completing their courses and exams in English-medium courses at undergraduate level in their own field of study. Students will develop oral skills in the following areas: structuring and delivering formal presentations and posters; taking part in discussions; and producing appropriately formal language.
Course contentPerception about speaker. Examples of bad presentations. The communication process. Presentation model. Delivering the presentation. Designing a conference poster. Preparing and recording the self presentation in a front of camera.
Teaching methodsclass discussion conducted by teacher, small group teaching, demonstration-performance method
Assessment methodcontinuing evaluation of realised tasks focused on three elements: language, technique and structure
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1prepares a good presentation of a technical subject in a computer software
LO2gives a clear, well-structured presentation of a typical technical subject
LO3elaborates a poster for a conference and has the ability to provide the discussion on the base of it
LO4express ideas and opinions with precision
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluation of the formal view of presentation (editorial and language verification, esthetics impression of graphical form, etc.)
LO2self-evaluating of student and the audience
LO3evaluation of the presentations
LO4evaluation of the poster and the quality of discussion
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationattending the class sessions30
preparing of data and looking for recources of the practical advices10
preparation for and participation in presentations5
elaboration of report and poster5
observing good presentations at web sources2
TOTAL:52
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities522.0
Basic references
  1. Gallo C.: 10 Presentation Techniques You Can (And Should) Copy From Apple’s WWDC Keynote. (https://www.forbes.com/sites/carminegallo/2013/06/11/ten-presentation-techniques-you-can-and-should-copy-from-apples-wwdc-keynote/#395e933f36ad)
  2. http://www.businessballs.com/presentation.htm
Supplementary references
  1. https://www.businessesgrow.com/2015/10/27/effective-presentation-techniques/
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeJaroslaw Makal, Ph.D. Eng.21.02.2020

Telecommunication Devices

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameTelecommunication DevicesCourse codeIS-FEE-10037S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
30000000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirementsradioelectronic devices or relevant
Course objectivesThe principal objective of lectures is to cover the fundamentals digital television and radio systems and radio transmitter structures.
Course contentStructures and technical parameters of radiotransmitters and receivers. Automated gain control and automated frequency control. Frequency synthesizers. Microwave oscillators, microwave tubes, magnetrons and klystrons. Principles of digital communication systems. Channels multiplexing methods: FDMA, TDMA, CDMA.
Teaching methodslecture, presentation.
Assessment methodoral exam, evaluation of student’s reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has the knowledge about structures and parameters of transmitters and receivers
LO2has the knowledge about principles microwave tubes and oscillators
LO3has the knowledge about AFC and AGC systems principle of works
LO4has the knowledge about principles of multiplexing communication channels
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluating the student’s reports and tests on lecture contentL
LO2evaluating the student’s reports and tests on lecture contentL
LO3evaluating the student’s reports and tests on lecture contentL
LO4evaluating the student’s reports and tests on lecture contentL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
CalculationLecture attendance30
preparation for and participation in exams/tests30
preparation reports from homeworks15
TOTAL:75
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities150.5
Basic references
  1. Li Richard Chi-Hsi: RF circuit design.
  2. Grebennikov A.: RF and microwave power amplifier design.
Supplementary references
  1. Sorentino R., Bianchi G.: Microwave and RF engineering.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMaciej Sadowski12.02.2020

Workshop on Programmable Logic Devices

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameWorkshop on Programmable Logic DevicesCourse codeIS-FEE-10038S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00003000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesUse of programmable logic device in real life example. Preparation of technical documentation, tools description and programming methods. Use of hardware description language to synthesise logic device controlling assigned plant. Oral presentation with discussion on individual project.
Course contentProgrammable logic device (PLD) especially field programmed gate array (FPGA) characterisation. Introduction to selected computer-aided design (CAD) tool and hardware description language (HDL). Programming and testing of logic devices based on standard and self-prepared libraries. Automatic control of selected peripheral device. Synthesis of real life example of logic devise based on FPGA module.
Teaching methodsproject/specialization workshop
Assessment methodprojects completion, presentation and discussion of the projects
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1characterize programmable logic devices
LO2gather information from technical documentation
LO3prepare his own technical documentation
LO4presents problems and solutions concerning assigned project
LO5use necessary programming tools
LO6use selected hardware description language
LO7identify time and funds necessary for project realization
LO8work well individually and in a group
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1project documentation and oral presentation
LO2project documentation
LO3initial project documentation
LO4oral presentation
LO5project documentation
LO6project documentation
LO7project documentation
LO8discussion of the student’s projects, evaluation of the student’s performance in classes
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in classes30
preparation for classes15
work on projects60
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the class1
preparation for and participation in project presentations6
TOTAL:112
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities1124.0
Basic references
  1. Deschamps J. P.: Synthesis of arithmetic circuits FPGA, ASIC and embedded systems. J. Wiley, 2006.
  2. Chu P. P.: FPGA prototyping by VHDL examples: Xiling Spartan-3 version. J. Wiley, 2008.
  3. http://www.altera.com/literature/lit-index.html
Supplementary references
  1. http://www.fpga4fun.com/
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeŁukasz Sajewski, Ph.D. Eng.08.02.2020

Automotive Electronics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameAutomotive ElectronicsCourse codeIS-FEE-10041S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150300000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTeaching a variety of problems related to contemporary automotive electronics. Student will explain electrical principles and their application in automotive electronics. Also student can receive the skills with the proper use of electrical test equipment.
Course contentLecture: Topics address electrical principles, semiconductor and integrated circuits, digital fundamentals, microcomputer systems based on microcontrollers, and electrical test equipment as applied to automotive technology. Laboratory class: Practical exercises in programming microcontrollers for automotive applications, diagnosis of selected automotive electronics systems.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class, individual consultations
Assessment methodlecture – set of reports, laboratory class – set of exercises and reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1recognises and understands the different wiring diagrams used in manafacturers workshop manuals
LO2identifies the various modules and sensors from the wiring diagrams
LO3determines the function and operation of the various modules and sensors and their application in the management of the vehicle control
LO4uses suitable programming tools
LO5writes software for selected automotive microcontrollers
LO6uses application notes and data sheets
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written report on lecture contentL
LO2written report on lecture contentL
LO3written report on lecture contentL
LO4written report on lecture contentLC
LO5evaluating the student’s laboratory reportsLC
LO6evaluating the student’s laboratory reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
individual work on lecture topics10
participation in laboratory class30
preparation for laboratory class15
work on reports20
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the class3
preparation for and participation in exams/final test7
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation502.0
Student workload – practical activities682.5
Basic references
  1. Hillier V. A. W.: Fundamentals of Automotive Electronics. 2005.
  2. Denton T.: Automobile Electronic & Electronic Systems. 2013.
  3. Bosch Technical Instruction: Emissions control technology for gasoline engines. 2016, Bentley Publishers.
  4. Bosch Fuel Injection and Engine Management. 2016, Bentley Publishers.
Supplementary references
  1. Barrett S.: Embedded Systems Design with the Atmel AVR Microcontroller. Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2009.
  2. Barrett S.: Atmel AVR Microcontroller Primer: Programming and Interfacing. Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2007.
  3. Bosch Technical Instruction Booklet: Automotive Microelectronics. 2003.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeWojciech Wojtkowski, Ph.D.2021-03-01

Project in IT Networks

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameProject in IT NetworksCourse codeIS-FEE-10042S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00030000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesAcquiring skills in creating and presenting projects of telecommunication and computer networks.
Course contentStudents prepare individual projects of the network structure for assumed enterprises (usually with a few departments). In typical case the prepared project includes a selected components like telephone network, computer network with security solutions, dedicated power supply network and some specific components like alarm signaling network or internal television system (CCTV). The finished project should include analysis of demands, suggestion of solutions, diagrams of network structure and cost calculation (capex and opex). The project can also include other parts, specific for particular application (e.g. analysis of legal aspects of using radio devices). The prepared projects are presented and discussed during classes.
Teaching methodsdiscussion, projects
Assessment methodprojects completion, presentation and discussion of the projects
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1obtain information from the literature, databases, and other sources for the project
LO2choose suitable contemporary network solutions and technologies in order to fulfill determined requirements
LO3design network structure according to given requirements
LO4create written documentation of the network design
LO5present, discuss and defend prepared project
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1project documentation
LO2project documentation
LO3project documentation
LO4project documentation
LO5oral presentation and discussion
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationpreparation of the project of the network structure80
work on documentation of the project30
consultations15
preparation to the presentation and defense of the project25
TOTAL:150
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation150.5
Student workload – practical activities1506.0
Basic references
  1. Comer D. E.: Internetworking with TCP/IP, Vol 1, Sixth edition. Addison-Wesley, 2013.
  2. Sportack M.: IP Addressing Fundamentals. Cisco Press, 2002.
  3. Documentation of the IT equipment and components.
Supplementary references
  1. Anderson R. J.: Security Engineering: A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems. Second edition, Wiley, 2008.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAndrzej Zankiewicz, PhD17.01.2020

Embedded Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameEmbedded SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10043S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150001500No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo acquaint students with embedded systems and to help them acquire practical skills in the configuration of embedded systems based on Linux.
Course contentCommercial and technical reasons to use embedded systems. Generic architecture of embedded linux systems. Basic shell commands. Efficient tools to generate embedded Linux systems: crosstool-ng, busybox, buildroot, OpenWRT. Configuring and compiling the kernel. Booting a Linux system. Examples of use of embedded systems.
Teaching methodslecture and specialization workshop
Assessment methodlecture – test; specialisation workshop – evaluation of reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has knowledge of the design and construction of embedded systems
LO2knows the tools for the installation and configuration of embedded systems
LO3is able to design and implement an embedded system using appropriate methods, techniques and tools
LO4is able to use available tools and develop their own tools and applications to extend the functionality of an embedded system
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1tests on lecture content, evaluating students’ reportsL, SW
LO2tests on lecture content, evaluating students’ reportsL, SW
LO3evaluating students’ reports, observation of work in classSW
LO4evaluating students’ reports, observation of work in classSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in specialisation workshop15
required reading15
work on reports15
participation in student-teacher sessions4
preparation for specialisation workshop15
preparation for the final test4
TOTAL:83
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation351.5
Student workload – practical activities592.0
Basic references
  1. Yaghmour K., Masters J., Yossef G. B., Gerum P.: Building Embedded Linux Systems. O’Reilly Media, Cambridge 2008.
  2. Sally G.: Pro Linux Embedded Systems. Apress, New York 2009.
  3. Love R.: Linux Kernel Development. Addison Wesley, New York 2010.
Supplementary references
  1. Monk S.: Raspberry Pi Cookbook: Software and Hardware Problems and Solutions. O’Reilly Media, Boston 2016.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeKrzysztof Konopko, Ph. D.16.01.2020

Computational Electromagnetics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameComputational ElectromagneticsCourse codeIS-FEE-10045S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
100002000No. of ECTS credits2
Entry requirements
Course objectivesDescription of widely used CAD methods for engineering problems dealing with the electromagnetic field: finite element method and finite difference method. Applications of these methods to electromagnetic issues (static models, low and high frequency).
Course contentLecture: Partial differencial equations: classification, method of solution. Physical model vs. mathematical model. Analytical solution vs. simulation. Modeling and Simulation Cycle, modeling methodology. 1D, 2D, 3D modeling. Time domain vs. time harmonic analysis. Narrowband vs. wideband analysis. 2D Mixed-Mode Modeling. Explicit vs. implicite methods. Models of materials in computational electromagnetics. Finite element method: weak form, classification of the elements, test functions. Local and global formulation. Declaration and physical interpretation of the boundary conditions. Perfectly Matched Layer conditions. Methods of adaptive meshing. Parametrization of the models. Coupled analysis of the phenomena. Finite difference calculus: differentia quotiens, differencing, discretization of the domain, spatial difference operators, implicit formulas. Specialization workshop: Solution and analysis of some EM phenomena issues using FEM and FDM methods.
Teaching methodsunderstands and explains the principles of computer aided modelling usind FEM and FD schemes.
Assessment methodlecture – final written test (at least 50% of points are necessary to pass); workshop – written reports and tests
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1understands and explains the principles of computer aided modelling usind fem and fd schmes
LO2is able to construct the proper model of em phenomena using fem and fd methods
LO3is able to interpret and assess the results of computations
LO4can prepare an advanced numerical model of the em problem
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluation of students’ reports and written testsL, SW
LO2evaluation of students’ reports and written testsL, SW
LO3evaluation of students’ reports and written testsL, SW
LO4evaluation of students’ reports and written testsL, SW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance10
preparation for workshops12
participation in workshops20
work on reports from workshop classes and/or work on home assignments12
participation in student-teacher sessions related to lectures and workshops4
preparation for and attendance at the final test from lectures2
TOTAL:60
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities461.5
Basic references
  1. Bhatti A. M.: Fundamental finite element analysis and applications: with Mathematica and Matlab computations. J. Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2005.
  2. Manassah J. T.: Elementary mathematical and computational tools for eletrical and computer engineers using Matlab. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2001.
  3. Elsherbeni A. Z., Demir V.: The finite-difference time-domain method for electromagnetics with MATLAB simulations. SciTech Publishing, Raleigh, 2009.
  4. Crow M.: Computational methods for electric power systems.
Supplementary references
  1. Hager G., Wellein G.: Introduction to high performance computing for scientists and engineers. CRC/Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, 2011.
  2. Schafer M.: Computational engineering : introduction to numerical methods. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2006.
  3. Zienkiewicz O. C., Taylor R.L., Zhu J.Z.: The finite element method: its basis and fundamentals. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2005.
  4. Taflove A.: Advances in computational electrodynamics : the finite-difference time-domain method.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeBoguslaw Butrylo, D.Sc., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof.2019-12-13

Instrumentation and Measurements

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameInstrumentation and MeasurementsCourse codeIS-FEE-10047S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150300000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo understand the basic working principles of electrical and electronic measuring instruments. To receive the skills to managing and operating analogue and digital instruments for a particular application. To learn the ways of presenting and interpreting results. To calculate the uncertainty of the direct and undirect single and multiple measurements.
Course contentIntroduction to metrology and measuring instruments; errors and uncertainties; instrument transformers and their applications; resistance, voltage and current measurements; power and energy measurements; impedance measurement; frequency measurement; analog-to-digital converters; digital oscilloscope.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory classes
Assessment methodlecture – written exam; laboratory classes- evaluation of written report, assessment of preparation to do exercises, evaluation of completing a measurement task
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1interprets the results of measurements and presents them in an appropriate form
LO2performs propre measurements of electrical quantities
LO3calculates limiting errors and uncertainties
LO4applies appropriate methods to measure basic electrical quantities
LO5implements and operates appropriate equipment in a measuring experiment
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1passing short tests before laboratory classes, making a report, passing an examL, LC
LO2making a report about laboratory exercise, completing a measurement taskLC
LO3making a report, passing an examL, LC
LO4evaluation of completing a measurement task, passing an examL, LC
LO5evaluation of completing a measurement task, making a reportLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc.30
preparation for classes, laboratory classes, projects, seminars, etc.30
working on projects, reports, etc.20
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project10
implementation of project tasks0
preparation for and participation in exams/tests20
TOTAL:125
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation572.0
Student workload – practical activities903.0
Basic references
  1. Carr J. J.: Elements of electronic Instrumentation and Measurement. Pearson Education, 2003.
  2. Bentley J.: Principles of Measurements Systems. Pearson Education, 2005.
  3. Doeblin E. O.: Measurement systems: Application and design, 5th edition. McGraw- Hill, 2003.
  4. Sydenham P., Thorn R.: Handbook of Measuring Systems Design.
Supplementary references
  1. Webster J. G.: The measurement, instrumentation, and sensors handbook. CRC Press LLC 1999.
  2. Potter R. W.: The art of measurement. Theory and Practice. Prentice Hall PTR 2000.
  3. Webster J. G., Eren H.: Measurement, instrumentation, and sensors handbook: spatial, mechanical, thermal, and radiation measurement. CRC/Taylor & Francis, 2014.
  4. JCGM – Joint Committee of Guides in Metrology, Evaluation of measurement data – Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement. 2008.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeJaroslaw Makal, Ph.D.20.01.2020

Internet of Things

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameInternet of ThingsCourse codeIS-FEE-10051S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
1501515000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirementsfundamentals of digital technique
Course objectivesThe course is designed to teach students about the Internet of Things (IoT), which relates to the study of sensors, serial data buses, actuators, cloud computing, MQTT protocol and controllers, IoT applications, system security and examples overview (building automation, transportation, healthcare, industry). After completing the course a student will explain principles of operation of a variety of IoT digital subsystems and will be able to design a simple IoT application.
Course contentLecture: Topics address main concepts behind the Internet of Things (the IoT paradigm, smart objects, convergence of technologies, security, protocols), technologies related to the Internet of Things, single board microcomputer IoT nodes, microcontroller based IoT nodes, sensors and serial interfaces. Laboratory class: Practical exercises in programming and designing IoT systems elements based on microcontrollers, single board microcomputers, FPGA and softcore processors and digital sensors. Project: Can encompass a broad field but should be relevant and related with the Internet of Things type of applications. (eg. microprocessor based control of an exemplary system, scheme, calculations, software, peripheral devices, cloud computing / database, web browser based data presentation and control). Dependant on how many participants of the course, a specialization can be made within the project but an understanding of the full design flow is vital for all participants.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class, project
Assessment methodlecture – written exam + oral exam, laboratory classes – evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes, project – project completion, presentation and discussion
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1recognise and understand wiring diagrams related to IoT nodes
LO2identify various data buses and interfaces from the wiring diagrams
LO3determine the function and operation of the various modules and sensors and have a good knowledge of how they are used in the management of the IoT devices
LO4use suitable programming tools
LO5use application notes and data sheets
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written test on lecture contentL
LO2written test on lecture contentL
LO3written test on lecture contentL
LO4evaluating the student’s reports and projectsLC, P
LO5evaluating the student’s reports and projectsLC, P
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in laboratory classes and project sessions30
preparation for laboratory classes and projects15
working on projects, reports15
implementation of project tasks20
preparation for and participation in exams/tests5
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation451.5
Student workload – practical activities803.0
Basic references
  1. Rao M.: Internet of Things with Raspberry Pi 3: Leverage the power of Raspberry Pi 3 and JavaScript to build exciting IoT projects. Packt Publishing Ltd., 2018.
  2. Girardin G., Bonnabel A., Mounier E.: Technologies & Sensors for the Internet of Things Businesses & Market Trends 2014 – 2024. Yole Développement, 2014.
  3. Waher P.: Learning Internet of Things. Packt Publishing, 2015.
  4. Bahga A., Madisetti V.: Internet of Things (A Hands-on-Approach). Published by authors 2014.
  5. Ida N.: Sensors, Actuators and Their Interfaces. Scitech Publishers, 2014.
Supplementary references
  1. Frenzel L. E.: Handbook of Serial Communications Interfaces: A Comprehensive Compendium of Serial Digital Input/Output (I/O) Standards. Elsevier, 2015.
  2. Papazoglou P. M.: An Educational Guide to the AVR Microcontroller Programming: AVR Programming::Demystified (Assembly Language). Kessariani, 2018.
  3. Barnett R. H., Cox S., O’Cull L.: Embedded C Programming and the Atmel AVR, 2nd Edition. Delmar Cengage Learning, 2006.
  4. Geddes M.: Arduino Project Handbook: 25 Practical Projects to Get You Started. 2016.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmePh.D., Eng. Wojciech Wojtkowski28-02-2021

Project of Electrical Installations in Industrial Building

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameProject of Electrical Installations in Industrial BuildingCourse codeIS-FEE-10060S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00030000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTeaching how to solve an engineering project task by means of the information obtained from literature, databases and other sources.
Course contentComplete with module content: Rules and statutory regulations, Installed power loads – Characteristics, LV architecture selection guide, Lighting installations, Sizing and protection of conductors, Protection against electric shocks, LV switchgear: functions & selection, Overvoltage protection, Reactive energy.
Teaching methodsdiscussion, presentation
Assessment methodprojects completion, presentation and discussion of the projects
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1can elaborate and realize the schedule of actions necessary to achieve the goal
LO2identyfies and describes basic technical solutions in the area of the project
LO3can calculate basic quantities describing operating simple systems connected with the area of the project
LO4is able to obtain information from the literature, databases, and other sources for the project
LO5can design circuits and systems in chosen field of electrical engineering
LO6is able to use the data sheets and application notes to
LO7is able to prepare and present a short presentation on of the completed project
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1project documentation and oral performance in project’s classes
LO2project documentation
LO3project documentation
LO4project documentation
LO5project documentation
LO6project documentation
LO7oral performance in project’s classes
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationwork on the project130
consultations30
preparation to the defence of the project20
TOTAL:180
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities1806.0
Basic references
  1. Seip G. G.: Electrical Installations Handbook. John Wiley & Sons. Third Edition, 2000.
  2. Atkinson B.: Electrical installation design. John Wiley & Sons, Fourth Edition, 2013.
  3. Standard IEC 60364: Low voltage installations.
  4. Electrical installation guide. According to IEC international standards. Schneider Electric. Edition 2016.
Supplementary references
  1. Electrical installation handbook. Protection, control and electrical devices. Technical guide. 6-th edition 2010, ABB Sace.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMarcin A. Sulkowski PhD, Eng13.01.2020

Introduction to Programming in C

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameIntroduction to Programming in CCourse codeIS-FEE-10061S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00003000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesDeveloping the skills of computer algorithms designing and implementing them in the form of programs in C language.
Course contentStructured programming in C language: data types, variables and constants, expressions and statements, operators, precedence of operators, formatted input/output, conditional statements, loops, arrays, pointers and dynamic memory allocation, structures, unions and bit fields, text and binary files, functions, passing argument to functions.
Teaching methodsmultimedia presentation, solving programming problems
Assessment methodtwo practical tests, evaluation of computer programs
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1writes and runs simple structured programs in c language using the appropriate data types and conditional statements
LO2uses loops and arrays in programs in c language
LO3defines and uses its own functions in programs in c language
LO4reads and writes data from and to files in programs written in c language
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1practical test, evaluation of computer programsSW
LO2practical test, evaluation of computer programsSW
LO3practical test, evaluation of computer programsSW
LO4practical test, evaluation of computer programsSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in specialization workshop30
preparation for specialization workshop18
working on homework (computer programs)18
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the specialization workshop5
preparation for practical tests (specialization workshop)10
TOTAL:81
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation351.5
Student workload – practical activities813.0
Basic references
  1. Prata S.: C Primer Plus (6th Edition) (Developer’s Library). Addison-Wesley Professional, 2013.
  2. Kernighan B. W., Ritchie D. M.: The C Programming Language. 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1988.
  3. Kochan S. G.: Programming in C (4th Edition) (Developer’s Library). Addison-Wesley Professional, 2014.
Supplementary references
  1. King K. N.: C Programming: A Modern Approach, 2nd Edition. W. W. Norton & Company, 2008.
  2. Reese R. M.: Understanding and Using C Pointers. O’Reilly Media, 2013.
  3. Shaw Z. A.: Learn C the Hard Way: Practical Exercises on the Computational Subjects You Keep Avoiding (Like C). Addison-Wesley Professional, 2015.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeJarosław Forenc, PhD23.02.2020

Object-Oriented Programming

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameObject-Oriented ProgrammingCourse codeIS-FEE-10062S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00003000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesFamiliarising students with the methods and structures used in object-oriented programming in C language. Implementation of a project consisting in self-writing the program in C with the practical application of methods of object-oriented programming.
Course contentPointers and functions. Overloading. An object and a class. Creation and destruction of the object. Objects and pointers. Properties and methods. Overloading of methods and operators. Encapsulation. Inheritance. Polymorphism and virtual methods. Standard Template Library.
Teaching methodspractical work and reports
Assessment methodverification of preparation for classes, evaluation of written programs
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1defines and uses in practice concepts in object-oriented programming
LO2designs, starts and tests the program in c++ written in accordance with the principles of object-oriented programming
LO3analyzes and corrects errors in the program
LO4uses libraries of classes and templates during practical writing of the program
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1assessment during the classes, evaluation of the projects
LO2assessment during the classes, evaluation of the projects
LO3assessment during the classes, evaluation of the projects
LO4assessment during the classes, evaluation of the projects
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in the laboratory30
preparation for the laboratory20
working and description of laboratory reports20
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the laboratory classes5
analysis and improvement of programs30
TOTAL:105
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation351.5
Student workload – practical activities1054.0
Basic references
  1. Stroustrup B.: The C++ Programming Language. 4th Ed., Addison-Wesley 2013.
  2. Savitch W.: Absolute C++. 5th Ed., Pearson, 2013.
  3. Stroustrup B.: A Tour of C++. Addison-Wesley, 2014.
  4. Gregoire M.: Professional C++. 3rd Ed., Wrox-Wiley, 2016.
  5. Johnson B.: Professional Visual Studio 2015. Wrox, 2015.
Supplementary references
  1. Liberty J., Rao S., Jones B.: Teach Yourself C++ in One Hour a Day. 8th Ed., SAMS, 2017.
  2. Schildt H.: C++ The Complete Reference. 4th Ed., McGraw-Hil, 2000.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and LightDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAdam Nikołajew, Ph.D.27.01.2020

Process Automation

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameProcess AutomationCourse codeIS-FEE-10063S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300030000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis course deals with the study of engineering principles and methodologies used to design and analysis of event driven (discrete) and continuous systems. Emphasis is placed on description methods and software implementation of combination and sequential systems. A structured approach to automation of selected systems, identifies appropriate equipment, production and manufacturing techniques.
Course contentAutomation of event driven systems (discrete) and continuous systems. Finite state machines theory. Melay and Moore machines. Description methods of combination, synchronous and asynchronous sequential systems and their elements. Types and conversion, codes. Diagram; state reduction; state assignment. Grafcet, SFC, Grafpol and Ladder diagram design sequence. PLC-based operative unit programming. Sequential logic implementation. Analysis by signal tracing and timing diagrams. Matlab Stateflow functions. Derivation of state tables and diagrams. True tables. Steps, transitions, connectors, direct links, logical conditions.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, Matlab/Simulink software, Matlab/Simulink, Stateflow toolbox, project examples, MathWorks help, text books
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, project – project completion, presentation and discussion, performance of the project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1basic knowledge of sequential and combinational circuits, programming methods, and designing of industrial automation process
LO2knowledge of even driven (digital) and continuous control systems hardware, principle of finite state machines, and background of automation systems
LO3knowledge of define of automation systems, ability to search, integrate and interpret information from literature and alternative sources
LO4practical skills to design of continuous and discrete control systems including their functionality and economic benefit, control systems' hardware selection ability and the self-tuning of controllers' parameters
LO5ability and skills to event driven control system design, and to formulate assumptions/conditions for the basic automation batch process
LO6demand for permanent education as well as an increased awareness of its vital importance for development
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written examL
LO2written examL
LO3written examL
LO4written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO5written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO6written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc.30
preparation for classes, laboratory classes, projects, seminars25
working on projects, reports, etc.45
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project5
implementation of project tasks and preparation for and participation in exams/tests22
TOTAL:157
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation682.5
Student workload – practical activities1164.0
Basic references
  1. Roth C. H.: Fundamentals Logic Design. Jaico Publishing, IV edition, 2002.
  2. Floyd T. L.: Digital Fundamentals. 10th edition, Pearson Education, 2009.
  3. Hugh J.: Automating Manufacturing Systems with PLCs. E-book, Ver. 5.0, 2007.
  4. Mano M. M., Ciletti M. D.: Digital Design. Pearson Education, 5th edition 2012.
  5. The MathWorks: Stateflow Toolbox for Matlab.
Supplementary references
  1. Bequette B. W.: Process Control, Modeling, Design and Simulation. Prentice Hall, 2003.
  2. Dorf R. C., Bishop R. H.: Modern Control Systems. 10th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2005.
  3. www.mathworks.com
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control andDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAssoc. Prof. Arkadiusz Mystkowski, PhD, DSc, Eng25.03.2020

Industrial Networks

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameIndustrial NetworksCourse codeIS-FEE-10064S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300030000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis course deals with study of engineering principles and methodologies used to design, configure and programing of the industrial network: PROFIBUS DP. Emphasis is placed on hardware and software engineering due to PLC controller’s networks based on the SIMATIC. This course fulfils the general maintenance of industry process-data exchanging between PLCs in the real-time control systems. A practice knowledge to network configuration and run-operations for peripheral devices and network diagnostics is also introduced.
Course contentBasic of industrial network PROFIBUS DP. Physical layer, cabling, parameters. Types of data transmission, communication’s protocols and bus data access methods. Fundamentals principles of PROFIBUS DP communication. Isochronous real-time (IRT) mode, layers and addressing of active and passive components. Programming of synchronous and asynchronous data exchange in PROFIBUS DP based on the SIMATIC. Diagnostic of PROFIBUS DP: diagnostic functions, errors detects and faults localization, monitoring, alarms and software blocks of PLC to data errors recording.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, PLC programming software, PLC simulators, text books and other technical data
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, project – project completion, presentation and discussion, performance of the project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1basic knowledge of principle of PROFIBUS DP network and communication protocols
LO2ability to programming of data exchange in the real-time industrial control systems and knowledge of distributed peripheral control devices
LO3basic knowledge of performing diagnostic software methods and topology design of PROFIBUS DP network and hardware components
LO4practical skills to design, configure, parameters set-up, start-run and service of the industrial network: PROFIBUS DP
LO5practical skills to programming of communication functions for PROFIBUS DP
LO6practical skills to programming diagnostic software methods, demand for cooperation with other student within group, as well as an increased awareness of its vital importance for development
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO2written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO3written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO4project evaluation, activity on project classesP
LO5project evaluation, activity on project classesP
LO6project evaluation, activity on project classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc30
preparation for classes, laboratory classes, projects, seminars, etc27
working on projects, reports, etc12
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project4
implementation of project tasks, preparation for and participation in exams/tests32
TOTAL:135
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation642.5
Student workload – practical activities803.0
Basic references
  1. Popp M.: The New Rapid Way to PROFIBUS DP. PROFIBUS Nutzerorganisation e.V., 2004.
  2. Mahalik N. P.: Fieldbus Technology: Industrial Networks Standards for Real-Time Distributed Control. Springer, 2003.
  3. EN 50170-2 PROFIBUS, EN 50254-3 PROFIBUS-DP, ICS 61158 i 61784 PROFINET.
Supplementary references
  1. Hugh J.: Automating Manufacturing Systems with PLCs. E-book, Ver. 5.0, 2007.
  2. Mackay S., Wright E., Reynders D., Park J.: Practical Industrial Data Networks: Design, Installation and Troubleshooting (IDC Technology). Elsevier Linacre House, 1st edition, 2004.
  3. Industrial Communication Catalog IK PI. Siemens, 2002/2003.
  4. www.profibus.com
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAssoc Prof. Arkadiusz Mystkowski, PhD, DSc, Eng25.03.2020

Computer Methods in Automatics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameComputer Methods in AutomaticsCourse codeIS-FEE-10065S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300030000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis course deals with the study of engineering principles and methodologies used main computer programs to solve fundamental problems in control plants and control systems. Major course topics include knowledge of Matlab/Simulink software used to computing, modelling, analysing and plotting of dynamical systems and linear control systems. Before attendance of this course, students should have basic knowledge of computer programming and description of control plants.
Course contentDescriptions of the main computer programs used in automatics. Introduction and fundamentals of Matlab. System functions and configuration of Matlab environment. Matrix and operations. Numerical computations. M-files and function scripts. Graphics, plotting and visualization in 2D and 3D. Modelling of dynamical systems with Control Toolbox. Design of complex dynamical systems by using Control Toolbox. Analysing dynamical systems in time and frequency domains in Matlab. Design linear control systems in Matlab. Introduction and fundamentals of Simulink. Setup and simulation parameters in Simulink. Modelling and simulations of dynamical systems in Simulink. Design and analysing of the complex control systems in Simulink. Group subsystems and map blocks in Simulink. Modelling and investigations of dynamical systems in Matlab Control Toolbox. Design and simulations of dynamical systems in Simulink. Design of linear control system with structurally unstable control plant in Matlab/Simulink. PID and LQR control design.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, Matlab/Simulink software, Matlab/Simulink Toolboxes, project examples, MathWorks help, text books, other documents given by the teacher
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, project – project completion, presentation and discussion, performance of the project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knowledge and solving of differential equations with using Matlab/Simulink
LO2modelling and solving of linear dynamic systems with Matlab/Simulink
LO3knowledge of methods of designing control plants in the Matlab/Simulink program
LO4practical skills needed to develop and calculate the modelling and control design problems with support of
LO5skills and knowledge acquired to a practical, hands-on project, linear control design methods with Matlab/Simulink
LO6demand for cooperation with other student within group, as well as an increased awareness of its vital importance for development
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO2written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO3written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO4written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO5written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO6student activity on project classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc30
preparation for classes, laboratory classes, projects, seminars, etc.42
working on projects, reports, etc.12
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project4
implementation of project tasks and preparation for and participation in exams/tests48
TOTAL:166
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation662.5
Student workload – practical activities1104.0
Basic references
  1. Tewari A.: Modern Control Design: with Matlab and Simulink. Wiley-IEEE Press, 2001.
  2. Ogata K.: Modern Control Engineering. 4th ed., Pearson Education International, 2002.
  3. Hahn B., Valentine D. T.: Essential Matlab for Engineers and Scientists. 3rd ed., Elsevier Science & Technology Books, 2007.
Supplementary references
  1. Bequette B. W.: Process Control, Modeling, Design and Simulation. Prentice Hall, 2003.
  2. Dorf R. C., Bishop R. H.: Modern Control Systems. 10th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2005.
  3. The MathWorks: Control System ToolboxTM User’s Guide. 8th ed., 2009.
  4. www.mathworks.com
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAssoc Prof. Arkadiusz Mystkowski, PhD, DSc, Eng25.03.2020

Modern Control of Mechatronics Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameModern Control of Mechatronics SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10066S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150015000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesThis course deals with the study of control theory including advanced robust optimal methods, such as H-infinity, mu-Synthesis, LMI, mixed-sensitivity, loop-shaping, uncertain systems, nonlinear observers, feedback linearization, control Lyapunov functions. Moreover, these designs with its applications to the mechatronics systems, including electro-drives, electrical circuits, electro-mechanical, electro-pneumatics, and hydraulics. Major course topics include knowledge of linear/nonlinear and applications engineering principles and methodologies used to solve advanced problems in control systems.
Course contentPrinciple subject outcomes include sensitivity and complementary sensitivity functions, H-2 and H-inf spaces. Dynamic systems with linear-parameter-varying. Design of structured and unstructured uncertainty. Robustness, small-gain theorem. Linear fractional transformation. Optimal control with H-2 or H-infinity. Mu-synthesis control. System order minimization. Stability of the nonlinear control systems according to control Lyapunov functions.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, Matlab/Simulink software, Matlab/Simulink Toolboxes, project examples, MathWorks help, text books, other documents given by the teacher
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, project – project completion, presentation and discussion, performance of the project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1basic knowledge of robust control design and application including optimal control, LFT models, and LPV systems
LO2basic knowledge of system order reduction and minimization methods, calculating of the system’s norms
LO3practical skills of stability calculating and control performance index for closed-loop dynamic systems
LO4practical skills needed to develop and calculate the modelling of the uncertain systems and robustness
LO5skills and knowledge acquired to numerical calculations and simulation of linear/nonlinear control system using Matlab/Simulink
LO6demand for cooperation with other student within group, as well as an increased awareness of its vital importance for developmentSM_K01
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO2written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO3written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO4written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO5written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO6student activity on project classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in classes15
preparation for projects30
working on projects, reports, etc40
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the project2
preparation to the exam23
TOTAL:125
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation381.5
Student workload – practical activities853.0
Basic references
  1. Isidori A.: Nonlinear control systems. Springer 1996.
  2. Marino R., Tomei P.: Nonlinear control design. Prentice Hall, 1995.
  3. Zhou K., Doyle J. C.: Essentials of robust control. Prentice Hall, 1998.
  4. Freeman R. A., Kokotović P. V.: Robust nonlinear control design, state-space and Lyapunov techniques. Birkhäuser, 2008.
  5. Ogata K.: Modern Control Engineering. 4th ed., Pearson Education International, 2002.
Supplementary references
  1. Dorf R. C., Bishop R. H.: Modern Control Systems. 10th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2005.
  2. Tewari A.: Modern Control Design: With Matlab and Simulink. Wiley-IEEE Press, 2001.
  3. Bequette B. W.: Process Control, Modeling, Design and Simulation. Prentice Hall, 2003.
  4. Potvin A. F.: Nonlinear Control Design Toolbox. The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA., 1994.
  5. The MathWorks: Control System ToolboxTM User’s Guide. 8th ed., 2009.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAssoc. Prof. Arkadiusz Mystkowski, PhD, DSc, Eng25.03.2020

Vector, Raster Computer Graphics and Visualization

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameVector, Raster Computer Graphics and VisualizationCourse codeIS-FEE-10067S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00030000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirementsIntroduction to Information Technology
Course objectivesTo provide the students with knowledge of computer graphics and visualization. The student will learn how to use Corel Graphics Suite programs (Corel Draw – for vector graphics and Corel Photo Paint – for raster graphics) and Adobe Photoshop (for raster graphics). The student will learn how to use SolidWorks (with toolboxes SW PhotoView 360 and SW Visualize) for visualization 3D objects. The practical skills will allow for self-realization of 2D and 3D computer graphics for didactic and technical purposes.
Course contentUsing programs for designing and editing vector and raster graphics (CorelDraw, Corel Photo-Paint, Adobe Photoshop) and engineering environment for creating visualization 3D graphics (SolidWorks with toolboxes PhotoView 360 and SW Visualize). Students will be perform graphical project of the multifaceted advertising campaign for new technical product in the form of the book of visual identification. To development a final project will be using vector and raster 2D computer graphics and technics of modelling, texturing and rendering 3D graphics.
Teaching methodsproject: work in groups, homework assignments; self-study under supervision: tutorial sessions with worked examples
Assessment methodelaboration of project + observation of work during classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1is able to characterize basic of design vector and raster 2D computer graphics and methods of solid modelling 3D object
LO2is able to create 2D vector graphics in Corel Draw program
LO3is able to create 2D raster graphics in Corel Photo Paint and Adobe Photoshop programs
LO4is able to basis modelling 3D in SolidWorks and technics of visualization object with textures, lights, shadows, cameras
LO5is able to rendering 3D object in SolidWorks PhotoView 360 and SW Visualize
LO6is able to work in groups
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
LO2elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
LO3elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
LO4elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
LO5elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
LO6elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in classes work30
preparation for projects35
working on individual project task10
participation in student-teacher sessions related to project2
TOTAL:77
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities773.0
Basic references
  1. Blundel B. G.: An Introduction to Computer Graphics and Creative 3-D Environments. Springer, 2008.
  2. Kipphan H.: Handbook of Print Media, Springer, 2001.
  3. Hughes J. F., Feiner S. K., Foley J. D., Akeley K., McGuire M., Dam A. V., Sklar D.F.: Computer graphics: principles and practice. 2013.
Supplementary references
  1. Vince J.: Geometry for Computer Graphics: Formulae, Examples and Proofs. Springer, 2004.
  2. Hearn D., Baker P.: Computer Graphics. Prentice Hall, New Delhi, 2007.
  3. Kiciak P.: Basis of modelling curves and planes, using in computer graphics. WNT, Warsaw, 2000 (in Polish).
  4. Internet, http://wikipedia.org
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmePh.D., Eng. Roman Trochimczuk18-02-2020

3D Modelling and Computer Animation

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course name3D Modelling and Computer AnimationCourse codeIS-FEE-10068S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00030000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirementsIntroduction to Information Technology
Course objectivesTo provide the students with knowledge of 3D modelling and computer animation (CGI – Computer Graphics Imaging). The student will learn how to use Anim8or program to create 3D animations. The practical skills will allow for self-realization of computer animation for didactic and technical purposes.
Course contentPrinciples of computer animation. Modelling objects and elements of a scene using curves, surfaces and solid elements. Sequence of motion. The relationship between bones and skeleton. Generation of the trajectory of an animated object. Scene settings (lights, cameras, shadows, materials). Morphing, warping, particle systems. Rendering.
Teaching methodsproject: work in groups, homework assignments; self-study under supervision: tutorial sessions with worked examples
Assessment methodelaboration of project + observation of work during classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1is able to classify and characterize basic of computer animation
LO2describes fundamental principles of computer animation
LO3is able to create a 3D model and sequence of motion in Anim8or program
LO4is able to modeling a 3D animated object with materials, lights, shadows, cameras
LO5is able to modeling a 3D animated object with morfing, warping and particle systems
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
LO2elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
LO3elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
LO4elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
LO5elaboration of project + observation of work during classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in project30
preparation for projects25
working on individual project task20
participation in student-teacher sessions related to project2
TOTAL:77
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities773.0
Basic references
  1. Blundel B. G.: An Introduction to Computer Graphics and Creative 3-D Environments. Springer, 2008.
  2. Kipphan H.: Handbook of Print Media, Springer, 2001.
  3. Byrne M. T.: Animation. The art of Layout and Storyboarding. Leixlip, Co. Kildare, Ireland, 1999.
  4. Parent R.: Computer Animation: Algorithms and Techniques. Newnes, 2012.
Supplementary references
  1. Kiciak P.: Basis of modeling curves and planes, using in computer graphics. WNT, Warsaw, 2000 (in Polish).
  2. Thomas F., Johnson O.: Disney animation – the illusion of life. Walt Disney Production, 1981.
  3. Internet, http://wikipedia.org
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmePh.D., Eng. Roman Trochimczuk18-02-2020

Computer-Based Measurement Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameComputer-Based Measurement SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10069S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150030000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirementsMathematics I, II, Signals Theory
Course objectivesTo familiarize students with the methods and ways of measurements of physical quantities using the computer-based measurement system. Presentation of the methods of measurement signals processing, their acquisition and graphical representation.
Course contentLecture: Fundamental measurement signals and sensors used in automation. Characteristics of measurement signals. Filtration methods and analysis of measurement errors. The rules of a program implementation in the LabView environment. The basic blocks of the Labview package. Control of measuring devices by a computer. Acquisition of measurement data. Analysis and presentation of data. Graphical user interface. Project: Measurement, acquisition and representation of real digital and analogue signals. Selection of measurement methodology and of construction of filters applied to measurement signals. Creating dedicated applications for acquisition, processing and representation of measurement signals.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, LabView software, instructions
Assessment methodlecture – written test; project – project implementation, presentation and
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1lists, classifies and characterizes measurement signals and elements of a computer measuring system
LO2selects a proper method for measurement of elementary physical parameters
LO3presents properly measurement results
LO4is able to implement designed algorithms for acquisition and processing of measurement signals
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written testL
LO2L: written test, P: project evaluation, activity on classesL, P
LO3L: written test, P: project evaluation, activity on classesL, P
LO4project evaluation, activity on classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in lectures15
participation in project classes30
preparation for exams/tests15
working on projects, reports, etc45
participation in consultations3
TOTAL:108
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation481.5
Student workload – practical activities783.0
Basic references
  1. Training materials of National Instuments (online).
  2. Ponce-Cruz P., Ramírez-Figueroa. F. D.: Intelligent control systems with LabVIEW. London, Springer-Verlag, 2010.
  3. Clark Cory L.: LabView digital signal processing and digital communication. McGraw-Hill, New York, 2005.
  4. Walczak J., Grabowski D., Maciążek M.: Introduction to digital signal processing. Gliwice, Wydaw. Politechniki Śląskiej, 2013.
Supplementary references
  1. LabView Core 1 and 2, course manual and exercises. National Instruments Corporation, 2009.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMichał Ostaszewski, PhD17.02.2020

Visualization of Industrial Processes

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameVisualization of Industrial ProcessesCourse codeIS-FEE-10070S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150030000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesIntroduction to the visualization systems used in industrial applications on the example of SCADA – Wonderware InTouch software.
Course contentLecture: Introduction to Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition systems: evolution, classification, types, characteristics. SCADA-HMI systems architecture: functions, capabilities (data processing, data recording, alarming, security). Communication in SCADA-HMI systems: DDE protocol, OPC protocol. Examples of SCADA-HMI systems. Project: Project in the InTouch environment: visualisation windows, tags and animation links, scripts and QuickScript, alarming, historic and real-time trends, communication with DDE protocol (external applications), communication with PLC controllers, project publication.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, Wonderware System Platform software, instructions
Assessment methodlecture – written test; project – project implementation, presentation and discussion
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knows and understands architecture of SCADA-HMI systems
LO2knows and understands functions and tasks fulfilled by SCADA-HMI systems
LO3knows programming languages suitable for SCADA systems
LO4can design efficient visualisation system of given technological process
LO5can configure scripts and implementation them in visualization systems
LO6can create individual and team projects
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written testL
LO2written testL
LO3written testL
LO4project evaluation, activity on classesP
LO5project evaluation, activity on classesP
LO6project evaluation, activity on classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationparticipation in lectures15
participation in project classes30
preparation for exams/tests15
working on projects, reports, etc45
participation in consultations2
TOTAL:107
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation481.5
Student workload – practical activities773.0
Basic references
  1. Wonderware ArchestrA System Platform in a Virtualized Environment Implementation Guide. 2014.
  2. InTouch HMI Getting Started Guide. 2014.
  3. InTouch HMI Scripting and Logic Guide. 2008.
  4. Wonderware OPCLink. 2003.
  5. Guyer J. P.: An Introduction to Fundamentals of SCADA Systems. 2017
Supplementary references
  1. Boyer S. A.: SCADA: Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition. 2004.
  2. Wright E.: Practical SCADA for Industry. 2003.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMichał Ostaszewski, PhD17.02.2020

Fundamentals of Electrical Problem Oriented Programming

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameFundamentals of Electrical Problem Oriented ProgrammingCourse codeIS-FEE-10071S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00003000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo introduce students to the basics of algorithms, Matlab program and programming in C language. To receive the abilities to design the algorithm and use special software for the analysis of electrical circuits. Developing the skills of computer algorithms designing and implementing them in the form of Matlab program and program in C language. Teaching students how to design and solve a problem of electrical circuits using Matlab program and Microsoft Visual C++ or Dev C++.
Course contentAlgorithm description methods. Block diagrams. Application of Matlab program to solve simple problems related to electrical engineering. Introduction to Matlab program (general structure of the program, arithmetic operations on real and complex numbers, operations on arrays and matrices, writing functions and scripts, execution and formatting of function graphs). Application programming in C language to solve simple problems related to electrical engineering. Introduction to: the structure of the program using C programming, terminology, data types, mathematical operations on variables, arrays, creating functions, using argument to functions.
Teaching methodsspecialization workshop
Assessment methodtwo practical tests, evaluation of computer programs, verification of preparation for classes, project completion, discussion
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1uses basic Matlab operations
LO2uses basic operation in C language
LO3creates and writes scripts and functions in Matlab program solve the electrical engineering problems
LO4creates and writes computes program in C language solve the electrical engineering problems
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1tests
LO2tests
LO3evaluating the student’s computer programs and project
LO4evaluating the student’s computer programs and project
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationattending the class sessions30
preparation for workshop activities10
working on homework20
preparation for practical tests15
participation in student-teacher sessions5
TOTAL:80
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation351.5
Student workload – practical activities803.0
Basic references
  1. Gilat A., Subramaniam V.: Numerical methods for engineers and scientists: an introduction with applications using MATLAB. John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2011.
  2. Prata S.: C Primer Plus (6th Edition) (Developer’s Library). Addison-Wesley Professional, 2013.
  3. Elsherbeni A. Z., Demir V.: The finite-difference time-domain method for electromagnetics with MATLAB simulations. SciTech Publishing, Raleigh, 2009.
  4. Kochan S. G.: Programming in C (4th Edition) (Developer’s Library). Addison-Wesley Professional, 2014.
Supplementary references
  1. Mathews J. H., Fink K. D.: Numerical methods using MATLAB. Pearson Education, 2004.
  2. Shaw Z. A.: Learn C the Hard Way: Practical Exercises on the Computational Subjects You Keep Avoiding (Like C). Addison-Wesley Professional, 2015.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAgnieszka Choroszucho, Ph.D. Eng.27.02.2020

Programmable Logic Controllers

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyAutomatic Control and RoboticsDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameProgrammable Logic ControllersCourse codeIS-FEE-10072S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300045000No. of ECTS credits6
Entry requirementsComputer Programming or equivalent
Course objectivesThis course deals with the study of engineering principles and methodologies used to design, configure and programming of PLC controllers. Emphasis is placed on hardware configuration and software engineering. Principle of PLC operation. PLC of various manufactures. Programming languages: STL (ST, IL), LAD and FBD. A structured approach to combination and sequential control design. Programming of binary and analog control systems. Before attendance of this course, students should have basic knowledge of computer programming.
Course contentPrinciple of PLC operation, definitions and terms. PLC cycle of operation. Knowledge of PLC modules. A/D and D/A PLC converters. Programming and logical structure of PLC. PLC data addressing, data types and memory management. Programming languages STL (ST, IL), FBD and LAD. Programming elements. Logic gates. Binary codes. Logic control instructions, data block instructions, counter instructions, timer instructions, math instructions, load and transfer (move) instructions, program control commands and comparison instructions. Digital control algorithms PID and PIDD. Principle of distributed control systems.
Teaching methodsPowerPoint presentations, PLC programming software, PLC simulators, text books and other technical data
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, project – project completion, presentation and discussion, performance of the project, defence of project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1basic knowledge of PLC logic operations with STL (ST, IL), LAD and FBD languages
LO2knowledge of defining of the PLC functions and logic operations
LO3knowledge of PLC hardware with modules, PLC cycle operation and PLC work principle
LO4practical skills to programming of PLC logic operations with embedded functions, and PID and PIDD digital PLC-oriented control algorithms
LO5ability and skills to set-up run-on and testing PLC control binary algorithms
LO6workgroup and cooperation skills, team work and project management, and demand for permanent education
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO2written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO3written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO4written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO5written exam, project evaluation, activity on project classesL, P
LO6activity on project classesP
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance30
participation in classes, laboratory classes, etc45
preparation for classes, laboratory classes, projects, seminars, etc.22
working on projects, reports, etc.18
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project5
implementation of project tasks and preparation for and participation in exams/tests35
TOTAL:155
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation803.0
Student workload – practical activities1204.0
Basic references
  1. Bryan L. A., Bryan E. A.: Programmable controllers, Theory and implementation. An Industrial Text Company Publication, Second Edition, Atlanta Georgia USA, 1997.
  2. Kwasniewski J.: Programmable Logic Controllers. Roma-Pol, Krakow, 2002.
  3. Hugh J.: Automating Manufacturing Systems with PLCs. E-book, Ver. 5.0, 2007.
  4. IEC 61131 (Part 1, 2 and 3), IEC standard for Programmable Controllers.
Supplementary references
  1. Bolton W.: Programmable Logic Controllers. 5th Edition, Elsevier, ISBN-10: 1856177513, 2009.
  2. Keith C. J.: The PLC Workbook: Programmable Logic Controllers made easy. 1996.
  3. Lewis R. W.: Programming industrial control systems using IEC 1131-3.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAssoc Prof. Arkadiusz Mystkowski, PhD, DSc, Eng22.01.2020

Introductory Physics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyEngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameIntroductory PhysicsCourse codeIS-FEE-10073S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00150000No. of ECTS credits2
Entry requirementsMathematics, Physics, Circuit Theory
Course objectivesStudents master basic physics concepts by performing an experiment relevant to corresponding work in the laboratory. Students gain hands-on experiences with experimental processes and develop effective written communication skills. Students develop collaborative learning skills by working in a group.
Course contentDetermination of the inductance of the coil. Study of the phenomenon of induction. Determination of the capacitor charging curve. Transformer testing. Generator and electric motor. Study of the electric field distribution. Study of the magnetic field of electric conductors. Measurement of magnetic induction in the electromagnet gap.
Teaching methodslaboratory classes, discussion
Assessment methodan assessment of the report based on the quality of the measurements, correctness of the computations and analysis of results, clarity of discussion, correctness of answers to questions, and neatness
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knows and understands the methods of measuring physical quantities, in particular those that characterize various types of the components and systems
LO2assigns the relevant principles and rules for existing problems
LO3uses the learned laws of physics, electricity and magnetism to solve typical physics problems
LO4analyzes and solves the engineering problems with the use of the physical approach
LO5carries out sample measurements and physical experiments in a self-connected electrical circuit
LO6demonstrates the basic communication skills by working in the groups on laboratory experiments and the thoughtful discussion and the interpretation of data
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1assessment of entrance tests, reports, discussions and activity in the classroomL
LO2assessment of entrance tests, reports, discussions and activity in the classroomL
LO3assessment of entrance tests, reports, discussions and activity in the classroomL
LO4assessment of entrance tests, reports, discussions and activity in the classroomL
LO5assessment of entrance tests, reports, discussions and activity in the classroomL
LO6assessment of entrance tests, reports, discussions and activity in the classroomL
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlaboratory classes15
preparation for classes15
work on reports (analyze, calculations, discussion)20
TOTAL:50
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation251.5
Student workload – practical activities402.0
Basic references
  1. Bird J.: Electrical Circiut. Theory and Technology. sixth edition, Routledge 2017.
  2. Halliday D., Resnick R.: Physics 1 and Physics 2. Wiley; 3rd edition.
  3. Feynman R. P., Leighton R. B., Sands M.: The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Basic Books; New Millennium ed. Edition.
  4. MacKay N. M.: Theory of Physics. Volumes 1 and 2, 2020.
Supplementary references
  1. Halliday D., Resnick R., Walker J.: Fundamentals of Physics. John Wiley and Sons, 7th edition.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrical Engineering, Power Electronics and Electrical Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAnna Maria Białostocka, Ph. D.28.02.2021

Local Communication Interfaces

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameLocal Communication InterfacesCourse codeIS-FEE-10074S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150300000No. of ECTS credits5
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTeaching a variety of problems related to contemporary digital systems based on micro-controllers and FPGA devices. Student will explain principles of operation of a variety of digital subsystems related to industrial digital systems and will understand basics of local communications interfaces and rules of the data exchange.
Course contentLecture: Topics address electrical principles, semiconductor and integrated circuits, local communication in microcomputer systems based on microcontrollers and FPGA devices, parallel and serial interfaces for local communication. Laboratory classes: Practical exercises in programming and designing digital systems based on microcontrollers and FPGA and using parallel and serial interfaces for local communication.
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory classes, individual consultations
Assessment methodlecture – set of reports; laboratory classes – set of exercises and reports
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1recognizes and understands wiring diagrams related to digital systems and local communication
LO2identifies various data buses and interfaces from the wiring diagrams
LO3determines function and operation of the various modules and sensors and has a good knowledge of how they are used in the management of the digital system
LO4distinguishes between various functions that are part of an industrial digital system
LO5uses suitable programming tools
LO6uses application notes and data sheets
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written report on lecture contentL
LO2written report on lecture contentL
LO3written report on lecture contentL
LO4written report on lecture contentL
LO5evaluating the student’s laboratory reportsLC
LO6evaluating the student’s laboratory reportsLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in laboratory classes30
preparation of reports related to the lecture30
preparation for a written test related to the classes, laboratory classes etc15
reports preparation related to the laboratory classes30
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the lecture and laboratory classes10
TOTAL:130
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation552.0
Student workload – practical activities903.0
Basic references
  1. Tocci R. J.: Digital Systems: Principles and Applications. 2014.
  2. Dally W. J.: Digital Design: A Systems Approach. 2012.
  3. Williams E.: AVR Programming: Learning to Write Software for Hardware. 2014.
  4. Donzellini G., Oneto L., Ponta D., Anguita D.: Introduction to Digital Systems Design. Springer, 2019.
  5. Yiu J.: The Definitive Guide to ARM® Cortex®-M3 and Cortex®-M4 Processors. 2014.
Supplementary references
  1. Barrett S.: Embedded Systems Design with the Atmel AVR Microcontroller. Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2009.
  2. Barrett S.: Atmel AVR Microcontroller Primer: Programming and Interfacing. Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2007.
  3. Kurniawan A.: Getting Started With STM32 Nucleo Development. 2015.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Control Engineering and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeWojciech Wojtkowski, Ph.D.26.02.2021

Database Systems and Security

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameDatabase Systems and SecurityCourse codeIS-FEE-10075S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150003000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo familiarize students with the knowledge of database systems and database languages. To help them acquire the skills of designing and using databases and database processing in different systems.
Course contentLecture: Introduction to database, basic terminology. History of database system development as well as their position and role in information system. Concept of relational model of data: terminology of relation, modelling of connections, notion of data integrity. Other models of data. Basics of SQL: definition and modification of data, queries, control of data. Design and management of a database: user interface, processing and optimisation of queries, protection, encoding and restoration of data. Processing of transactions. Development trends of database systems. Specialization workshop: Design, programming and implementation of a database: modelling of a database and its constraints. Standards of SQL language: key words, identifiers, names, notation; definition, manipulation and connectivity of data. Verifications of data integrity, connections, queries, subqueries, transactions on testing data. Forming and processing of queries, management of memory and transactions.
Teaching methodsinformative and problem lecture, discussions, implementation of projects
Assessment methodlecture – written test; specialization workshop – evaluation of projects, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1knows the basic concepts of a relational data model, design techniques and security of databases
LO2can develop documentation of the project task implementation, prepare and introduce a presentation on the implementation of the project task
LO3can choose solutions for the designed database, evaluate and compare design solutions and can discuss their results
LO4is ready to work in a team, to think and act creatively
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1final test, documentation of the projectL, SW
LO2documentation and presentation of the projectSW
LO3report on project implementation and discussion on the projectSW
LO4discussion on the project, observation of students 'work in classesSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in seminar workshop30
preparation for seminar workshop15
completion of project tasks (including work on reports)20
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes5
preparation for and participation in the final test20
TOTAL:105
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation502.0
Student workload – practical activities853.0
Basic references
  1. Kroenke D. M., Auer D. J.: Database concepts. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Education, 2011.
  2. Garcia-Molina H., Ullman J. D., Widom J.: Database systems: the complete book. Upper Saddle River: Prentice-Hall, 2002.
  3. Elmasri R. A., Navathe S. B.: Fundamentals of database systems. Boston: Pearson Addison-Wesley, 2011.
Supplementary references
  1. Connolly T., Begg C.: Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation, and Management. Pearson, 2015.
  2. Ras Z. W. (Ed.), Dardzińska A. (Ed.): Advances in data management. Berlin: Springer, 2009.
  3. Król D. (Ed.), Nguyen N. T. (Ed.), Shirai K.(Ed.): Advanced topics in intelligent information and database systems.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeGrażyna Gilewska, Ph. D.25.02.2021

Fundamentals of Real-Time Operating Systems

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameFundamentals of Real-Time Operating SystemsCourse codeIS-FEE-10076S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
150150000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesStudents acquire knowledge on the architecture and basic functional components of a selected real-time operating systems (RTOS). Students develop the theoretical and practical knowledge on preparing and testing of applications that communicate in real time using a physical microprocessor-based system.
Course contentLecture: The operating system – tasks, architecture, basic work mechanisms. POSIX standard. Architecture of real-time operating systems: system kernel, process and task management, synchronization and inter-task communication, alarms, interrupts.
Teaching methodslecture, presentation, practical work in laboratory, small group discussion
Assessment methodlecture – written exam, laboratory class – set of exercises
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1defines a real-time operating system and its properties
LO2specifies the basic components of a real-time operating system and the rules of their interoperation
LO3describes the features and implementation solutions of selected commercial real-time operating systems, knows examples of such systems
LO4creates algorithms for the implementation of real-time control tasks in selected programming techniques
LO5can create and test an application running
LO6can configure the system for cooperation
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1written test on lecture contentL
LO2written test on lecture contentL
LO3written test on lecture contentL
LO4evaluation of the report on exerciseLC
LO5evaluation of the report on exerciseLC
LO6evaluation of the report on exerciseLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlecture attendance15
participation in laboratory classes15
preparation for laboratory classes10
working on reports10
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the laboratory classes5
preparation for and participation in exam20
TOTAL:75
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation371.5
Student workload – practical activities401.5
Basic references
  1. Liu Jane W. S.: Real-time systems. New York, Prentice Hall, 2000.
  2. Stallings W.: Operating systems: internals and design principless. Pearson,
  3. Tanenbaum A. S.: Modern operating systems. Pearson Education,
  4. Walls C.: Building a Real Time Operating System. Elsevier Science & Technology, 2019.
  5. Wang K. C.: Embedded and Real-Time Operating Systems. Springer, 2017.
  6. Wang J.: Real-Time Embedded Systems. Wiley, 2017.
Supplementary references
  1. Siewert S., Pratt J.: Real-Time embedded components and systems with Linux and RTOS. Ingles, 2016.
  2. QNX NeutrinoR RTOS. User’s Guide For QNX Neutrino 6.5.0; Photon microGUI
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Automatic Control and RoboticsDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeRafał Kociszewski, PhD Eng.25.02.2021

Antennas and propagation

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameAntennas and propagationCourse codeIS-FEE-20006S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300001500No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirementsHigh frequency techniques or equivalent
Course objectivesThe aim of the course is to acquaint the students with radiation, transmission and reception of electromagnetic waves, with particular emphasis on the different antenna designs and applications of antennas in wireless communication systems. Training skills for using of software for computer-aided analysis and design of consumer antennas, taking graphical environment 4NEC2 as an example.
Course contentClassification and properties of antennas. Basics of radiation theory. Radiation pattern, antenna parameters. Range equation. Electromagnetic field radiated by elementary antennas: Hertz dipole and magnetic dipole. Radiation field of a symmetric thin-wire antenna. Features of a short dipole. Antennas over a ground plane. Feeding of wire antennas, impedance matching, baluns. Antenna arrays, phased arrays. Wire reflectors and directors, Yagi-Uda antennas. Travelling-wave antennas. Frequency-independent and log-periodic antennas. Aperture antennas. Radiation patterns of nonuniform feeded arrays and aperture antennas. Horn antennas, parabolic-reflector antennas, lens antennas. Radiation from microstrips and slots. Antennas in consumer appliances. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in the Earth’s atmosphere, urban and country areas.
Teaching methodslecture, specialization workshop
Assessment methodlecture: oral exam; specialization workshop: verification of preparation for workshop, evaluation of reports, completion, presentation and discussion of a final project
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has detailed knowledge on basic structures of antennas, applied, among others, in wireless communication systems
LO2has knowledge on transmission of electromagnetic waves in wireless systems and networks
LO3has knowledge on developments in the field of antenna design
LO4can obtain information from the literature and other sources, also in a foreign language, can interpret the information and draw conclusions
LO5can work individually and in a small team
LO6can develop documentation on a project task
LO7can prepare and give a presentation on the results of a project task
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam, evaluation of the student’s performance during workshopsL, SW
LO2exam, evaluation of the student’s performance during workshopsL, SW
LO3exam, evaluation of the student’s performance during workshopsL, SW
LO4exam, evaluation of the student’s performance during workshopsL, SW
LO5evaluation of the student’s performance during workshopsSW
LO6evaluating the student’s project and reportsSW
LO7evaluating a presentation on the results of a project taskSW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationattending the class sessions30
preparation for specialization worshop15
work on presentations15
preparation for and participation in exams/tests5
work on reports from workshop classes and/or work on home assignments20
participation in student-teacher sessions related to lectures and workshops5
preparation for and attendance at the final test from lectures10
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation502.0
Student workload – practical activities602.5
Basic references
  1. Milligan T. A.: Modern antenna design. IEEE Press, J. Wiley Interscience, 2005.
  2. White J. F.: High frequency techniques – an introduction to RF and microwave engineering. J. Wiley Interscience, 2004.
  3. Collin R. E.: Antennas and radiowave propagation.
Supplementary references
  1. Hickman I.: Practical radio frequency handbook.
  2. IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine.
  3. IEEE Microwave Magazine.
  4. Aniserowicz K.: Lecture notes.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeprof. Karol Aniserowicz.26.01.2020

Electromagnetic Compatibility

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronics EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameElectromagnetic CompatibilityCourse codeIS-FEE-20007S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
300150000No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirements
Course objectivesKnowledge on basic phenomena related to generation, propagation and effects of electromagnetic disturbances. Knowledge on methods of EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) testing, both in immunity and emission, and basic characteristics of EMC test equipment. Skils of using EMC equipment and performing basic EMC and related supplementary tests and measurements. Skills of proper illustration, interpretation and assessment of the test results.
Course contentIntroduction to EMC (Electromagentic Compatibility), EMC standards. Sources of electromagnetic disturbances, their characteristics and related threat. Basic principles of disturbing effects of various electromagnetic signals, electromagnetic couplings. EMC testing of immunity of electronic and electrical equipment to electromagnetic disturbances (principles, test set-ups and equipment, test levels). EMC testing of electromagnetic emissions from electronic and electrical equipment (principles, test set-ups and equipment, acceptable levels).
Teaching methodslecture, laboratory class
Assessment methodlecture – written or oral exam; laboratory class – evaluation of student’s reports, verification of preparation for classes
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1characterizes phenomena of generation, propagation and effects of electromagnetic disturbances on electronic and electrical equipment; characterizes methods of EMC testing and basic test equipment
LO2conducts selected EMC tests and related supplementary tests or measurements
LO3plans and prepares protocols that document the conducted EMC tests and measurements
LO4illustrates and analyses the results of the EMC tests and measurements
LO5interprets, compares and assesses the results of the EMC tests and measurements
LO6refers EMC problems to relevant standards
LO7applies rules of safety and hygiene of work
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1exam on lecture content, verification of preparation for laboratory classesL, LC
LO2evaluation of student’s reports and performance at classesLC
LO3evaluation of student’s reports and performance at classesLC
LO4evaluation of student’s reportsLC
LO5evaluation of student’s reportsLC
LO6exam on lecture content, evaluation of student’s reports and performance at classesLC, L
LO7evaluation of student’s reports and performance at classesLC
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationattending the lecture30
participation in laboratory classes15
preparation for laboratoratory classes15
work on reports from laboratory classes25
preparation for and participation in /tests and exam15
TOTAL:100
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation451.5
Student workload – practical activities652.5
Basic references
  1. Milligan T. A.: Modern antenna design. IEEE Press, J. Wiley Interscience, 2005.
  2. White J. F.: High frequency techniques – an introduction to RF and microwave engineering. J. Wiley Interscience, 2004.
  3. Collin R. E.: Antennas and radiowave propagation. McGraw-Hill, 1985.
Supplementary references
  1. Hickman I.: Practical radio frequency handbook. Newnes, 2002.
  2. IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine.
  3. IEEE Microwave Magazine.
  4. Aniserowicz K.: Lecture notes.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeRenata Markowska26.01.2020

Photonics

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronics EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course namePhotonicsCourse codeIS-FEE-20008S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
003001500No. of ECTS credits4
Entry requirementsbasics of photonics
Course objectivesAcquainting students with the optical phenomena in semiconductors, glasses and photonics structures. Teaching the rules of the use of quantum wells in semiconductor emitters and detectors of radiation. Introduction to selected photonics structures and phenomena occurring in them. Teaching the measurement methods of properties of both photonic components and layouts. Presentation of modern trends in development of photonics. Introduction to selected non-linear optical elements.
Course contentThe basics of the optical phenomena in semiconductors, glasses, photonic structures and optical waveguides. Low dimensional structures – the principle of the use of quantum wells in semiconductor emitters of radiation. Basics of wave optics. Periodic optical structures – a construction of selected elements, The construction and selected applications of the matrix of sources and detectors with low-dimensional structures. The phenomenon of optical bistability. Spectroscopy of optical materials, absorption – luminescence. Nonlinear phenomena.
Teaching methodslaboratory classes, specialization workshop, projects' reports
Assessment methodtests; laboratory classes – evaluation of reports, verification of preparation for classes, presentation and discussion
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1has detailed knowledge of photonics
LO2explains optical phenomena occurring in semiconductors and photonic structures
LO3measures and analyzes the properties of semiconductor emitters of radiation
LO4measures and analyzes the spectroscopic properties of materials used in photonics
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes and specialization workshopLC, SW
LO2evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes and specialization workshopLC, SW
LO3evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes and specialization workshopLC, SW
LO4evaluation of the report on exercise, a discussion during the laboratory classes and specialization workshopLC, SW
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationlaboratory classes and workshop sessions attendance45
preparation for laboratory classes15
working on projects, reports, etc.10
participation in student-teacher sessions related to the classes/seminar/project5
preparation for and participation in exams/tests5
TOTAL:80
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation502.0
Student workload – practical activities803.0
Basic references
  1. Kasap S., Ruda H., Boucher Y.: Cambridge illustrated handbook of optoelectronics and photonics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2012.
  2. Jamal Deen M., Basu P. K.: Silicon photonics: fundamentals and devices. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester 2012.
Supplementary references
  1. Tkachenko N. V.: Optical Spectroscopy, Elsevier, 2006.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Photonics, Electronics and Lighting TechnologyDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeMarcin Kochanowicz, PhD, DSc26.01.2020

Master Thesis

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronics EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameMaster ThesisCourse codeIS-FEE-20010S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
0000000No. of ECTS credits20
Entry requirements
Course objectives
Course contentDepending of the topic of master thesis.
Teaching methodsindividually plans the solution of research problem, specifying its manner and duration
Assessment methodevaluation of the work by the supervisor and reviewer and thesis defense
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1individually plans the solution of research problem
LO2can obtain knowledge from literature sources (including
LO3develops methodology of research, carries out research
LO4has the ability to raise qualifications required to
LO5formulates specific objectives of the research task
LO6can suggest improvements to existing
LO7can evaluate the innovativeness of used devices
LO8understands his role in society and the need to
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1positive evaluation of the thesis and the positive result of defense
LO2positive evaluation of the thesis and the positive result of defense
LO3positive evaluation of the thesis and the positive result of defense
LO4positive evaluation of the thesis and the positive result of defense
LO5positive evaluation of the thesis and the positive result of defense
LO6positive evaluation of the thesis and the positive result of defense
LO7positive evaluation of the thesis and the positive result of defense
LO8positive evaluation of the thesis and the positive result of defense
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationrealization of master thesis project400
preparation for the final exam65
elaboration of the final presentation35
TOTAL:500
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation00.0
Student workload – practical activities50020.0
Basic references
  1. related to the topic of the master thesis
Supplementary references
  1. related to the topic of the master thesis
Organisational unit conducting the courseAll units of the Faculty of Electrical EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programme2020-01-26

Numerical Design and Analysis of Metamaterials

Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Field of studyElectrical and Electronic EngineeringDegree level and programme typebachelor’s degree
Specialization / diploma pathStudy profile
Course nameNumerical Design and Analysis of MetamaterialsCourse codeIS-FEE-20014S
Course typeelective
Forms and number of hours of tuitionLCLCPSWFWSSemestersummer
00003000No. of ECTS credits3
Entry requirements
Course objectivesTo introduce students to the basics of metamaterial terminology and characterization techniques. To receive an ability of designing functional structures using the transformation optics method. To apply the scattering matrix method for extraction of composite effective parameters. To acquaint students with computations of physical fields using numerical-analysis software. To teach students how to synthesize metamaterial structure utilizing layered composites.
Course contentTerminology, definitions, classification of electromagnetic composites. Characterization of some thermal, DC electric and magnetic as well as microwave metamaterials. Analytic and iterative design techniques of structures and systems requiring complex materials. Introduction to numerical-analysis software and 3D CAD modeling in computational electromagnetics. Homogenization techniques: effective properties identification of composite materials using simulation software. Physical field computations and analysis.Self-working on some problems in design of metamaterials with specified properties/characteristics
Teaching methodsspecialization workshop
Assessment methodverification of preparation for classes, written reports, project completion, discussion
Symbol of learning outcomeLearning outcomesReference to the learning outcomes for the field of study
LO1uses proper definitions and concepts related to metamaterials, numerical models and field analysis
LO2describes the structure, parameters and properties of composite material with relation to specified applications
LO3design metamaterial structures using introduced methods
LO4creates and computes numerical models of some metamaterials
LO5discusses critically the construction of numerical model and computation results
Symbol of learning outcomeMethods of assessing the learning outcomesType of tuition during which the outcome is assessed
LO1personal assessment, short tests
LO2written reports, evaluating the student’s solution of specified project
LO3written reports, work assessment during classes
LO4evaluating the student’s solutions of specified problems, written reports
LO5evaluating the student’s solution of specified project, personal assessment
Student workload (in hours)No. of hours
Calculationpreparation for workshop5
working on reports10
working on projects30
workshop attendance30
TOTAL:75
Quantative indicatorsHoursNo. of ECTS credits
Student workload – activities that require direct teacher participation301.0
Student workload – practical activities753.0
Basic references
  1. Capolino F.: Metamaterials Handbook – Two Volume Slipcase Set 1st Edition. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2009.
  2. Huang J.-P.: Theoretical Thermotics: Transformation Thermotics and Extended Theories for Thermal Metamaterials. Springer Nature, 2020.
  3. Banerjee B.: An introduction to metamaterials and waves in composites. CRC Press Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton, 2011.
  4. Moore R.: Electromagnetic composites handbook. McGraw-Hill Education, 2016.
Supplementary references
  1. Han T. et al.: Full control and manipulation of heat signatures: cloaking, camouflage and thermal metamaterials. Advanced Materials 26, 2014.
  2. Han T., Qiu C. W.: Transformation laplacian metamaterials: recent advances in manipulating thermal and DC fields. Journal of Optics 18, 2016.
  3. Cui T. J., Smith D., Liu R.: Metamaterials: Theory, Design, and Applications. Springer Science & Business Media, 2009.
  4. Pal R.: Electromagnetic, mechanical, and transport properties of composite materials. CRC Press, 2014.
Organisational unit conducting the courseDepartment of Electrotechnics, Power Electronics and Power EngineeringDate of issuing the programme
Author of the programmeAdam Steckiewicz, PhD Eng25.02.2020

Na skróty
× W ramach naszego serwisu www stosujemy pliki cookies zapisywane na urządzeniu użytkownika w celu dostosowania zachowania serwisu do indywidualnych preferencji użytkownika oraz w celach statystycznych.
Użytkownik ma możliwość samodzielnej zmiany ustawień dotyczących cookies w swojej przeglądarce internetowej.
Więcej informacji można znaleźć w Polityce Prywatności
Korzystając ze strony wyrażają Państwo zgodę na używanie plików cookies, zgodnie z ustawieniami przeglądarki.
Akceptuję Politykę prywatności i wykorzystania plików cookies w serwisie.